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Ashley K Clift, Omar Faiz, Robert Goldin, John Martin, Harpreet Wasan, Marc-Olaf Liedke, Erik Schloericke, Anna Malczewska, Guido Rindi, Mark Kidd, Irvin M Modlin and Andrea Frilling

Introduction Small bowel (SB) neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are accruing significant clinical attention due to their increasing incidence ( 1 , 2 ) in addition to recent advances in their molecular biology ( 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 ) and treatment

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Felix Haglund, Gustaf Rosin, Inga-Lena Nilsson, C Christofer Juhlin, Ylva Pernow, Sophie Norenstedt, Andrii Dinets, Catharina Larsson, Johan Hartman and Anders Höög

Introduction Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is defined as a parathyroid tumour producing excessive amounts of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which in turn leads to hypercalcaemia. Most parathyroid tumours are adenomas but are nonetheless associated

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Magaly Zappa, Olivia Hentic, Marie-Pierre Vullierme, Matthieu Lagadec, Maxime Ronot, Philippe Ruszniewski and Valérie Vilgrain

Introduction Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a heterogeneous group of tumours arising from endocrine and nervous system cells. Two of the most common anatomical sites of origin are the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreatic islet cells, both

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Logan Mills, Panagiotis Drymousis, Yogesh Vashist, Christoph Burdelski, Andreas Prachalias, Parthi Srinivasan, Krishna Menon, Corina Cotoi, Saboor Khan, Judith Cave, Thomas Armstrong, Martin O Weickert, Jakob Izbicki, Joerg Schrader, Andreja Frilling, John K Ramage and Raj Srirajaskanthan

Introduction Small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours pose a management dilemma between surveillance and resection due to the uncertain natural history of these tumours. The case for surveillance in tumours ≤2 cm is supported by European

Open access

Anne M Drewes, Maria E Møller, Rasmus Hertzum-Larsen, Gerda Engholm and Hans H Storm

. Apart from ionising radiation, we have limited knowledge on risk factors for brain tumours, and for breast cancer hormone-related factors, for example, null parity, late age pregnancies, overweight, alcohol consumption and genetic mutations ( BRCA1 and

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K G Samsom, L M van Veenendaal, G D Valk, M R Vriens, M E T Tesselaar and J G van den Berg

Introduction Well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) represent a heterogeneous group of rare tumours, which have a relatively indolent disease course. Primary NETs can arise from neuroendocrine cells at various anatomic sites. They

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Manon Engels, Paul N Span, Rod T Mitchell, Joop J T M Heuvel, Monica A Marijnissen-van Zanten, Antonius E van Herwaarden, Christina A Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Egbert Oosterwijk, Nike M Stikkelbroeck, Lee B Smith, Fred C G J Sweep and Hedi L Claahsen-van der Grinten

the male CAH patients from 12.5% up to 94% are reported to develop testicular adrenal rest tumours (TARTs), which are an important cause of infertility ( 1 , 2 ). TARTs are benign tumours with steroidogenic characteristics, located near the

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Eva Jakobsson Ung, Ann-Charlotte Olofsson, Ida Björkman, Tobias Hallén, Daniel S Olsson, Oskar Ragnarsson, Thomas Skoglund, Sofie Jakobsson and Gudmundur Johannsson

Introduction Pituitary tumours are rare; for example, the annual incidence of non-functioning pituitary adenomas is 0.65–2.34 per 100,000 ( 1 , 2 , 3 ). Although most pituitary tumours are benign, patients often need to undergo surgery and

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Yusaku Mori, Eunhyoung Ko, Rudolf Furrer, Linda C Qu, Stuart C Wiber, I George Fantus, Mario Thevis, Alan Medline and Adria Giacca

glargine, it is necessary to evaluate its effect on mammary tumour promotion in animal models. Unlike AspB10, an insulin analogue with proven tumourigenic potential ( 23 ), glargine did not increase the incidence of spontaneous mammary tumours in wild

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Kate E Lines, Mahsa Javid, Anita A C Reed, Gerard V Walls, Mark Stevenson, Michelle Simon, Kreepa G Kooblall, Sian E Piret, Paul T Christie, Paul J Newey, Ann-Marie Mallon and Rajesh V Thakker

Introduction Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet and anterior pituitary tumours. In addition, some patients may also develop adrenal