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Julia Kubiak, Per Medbøe Thorsby, Elena Kamycheva and Rolf Jorde

2017, Seibert et al . found no effect on CVD risk factors with 800 IU vitamin D/day in 105 vitamin D-insufficient subjects ( 16 ). However, many of these negative results might be explained by inclusion of subjects that were vitamin D sufficient, and

Open access

Changwei Liu, Jingwen Wang, Yuanyuan Wan, Xiaona Xia, Jian Pan, Wei Gu and Mei Li

vitamin D status in T1DM and controls were showed in Table 3 . In the total T1DM children, the deficient group was 13.18% (39/296), the insufficient group was 36.48% (108/296), and the deficient and insufficient subgroup was 49.66% (147/296), while in the

Open access

Diana-Alexandra Ertl, Andreas Gleiss, Katharina Schubert, Caroline Culen, Peer Hauck, Johannes Ott, Alois Gessl and Gabriele Haeusler

considerable proportion of the women with induced puberty no longer had any estrogen therapy ( 14 ). The reasons for insufficient medical care for women with TS in adulthood may be manifold. Transfer from pediatric to adult medical care is a challenge for

Open access

Luca Persani, Biagio Cangiano and Marco Bonomi

Introduction Central hypothyroidism (CeH) is a rare and heterogenous hypothyroid condition resulting from an insufficient stimulation of an otherwise normal thyroid gland by the hypophyseal thyrotropin hormone (TSH). This loss of central

Open access

Christian Trummer, Stefan Pilz, Verena Schwetz, Barbara Obermayer-Pietsch and Elisabeth Lerchbaum

Introduction Considering the high prevalence of an insufficient vitamin D status in many populations as well as the potential link between low vitamin D status and adverse health outcomes ( 1 ), vitamin D deficiency is classified as an

Open access

Huy Gia Vuong, Uyen N P Duong, Ahmed M A Altibi, Hanh T T Ngo, Thong Quang Pham, Hung Minh Tran, Greta Gandolfi and Lewis Hassell

reviewers, if present, were resolved again by discussion and consensus. In cases of insufficient data in the original papers or unpublished data, we tried to obtain potential further data by contacting the authors via email. Studies in which data of HR and

Open access

Stan Ursem, Vito Francic, Martin Keppel, Verena Schwetz, Christian Trummer, Marlene Pandis, Felix Aberer, Martin R Grübler, Nicolas D Verheyen, Winfried März, Andreas Tomaschitz, Stefan Pilz, Barbara Obermayer-Pietsch and Annemieke C Heijboer

determined the effect of vitamin D supplementation on n-oxPTH concentrations in an RCT in hypertensive vitamin D-insufficient patients with preserved kidney function and found a significant decrease in n-oxPTH concentration during supplementation. Moreover

Open access

M Axelstad, U Hass, M Scholze, S Christiansen, A Kortenkamp and J Boberg

Human semen quality is declining in many parts of the world, but the causes are ill defined. In rodents, impaired sperm production can be seen with early life exposure to certain endocrine-disrupting chemicals, but the effects of combined exposures are not properly investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of early exposure to the painkiller paracetamol and mixtures of human relevant endocrine-disrupting chemicals in rats. One mixture contained four estrogenic compounds; another contained eight anti-androgenic environmental chemicals and a third mixture contained estrogens, anti-androgens and paracetamol. All exposures were administered by oral gavage to time-mated Wistar dams rats (n = 16–20) throughout gestation and lactation. In the postnatal period, testicular histology was affected by the total mixture, and at the end of weaning, male testis weights were significantly increased by paracetamol and the high doses of the total and the anti-androgenic mixture, compared to controls. In all dose groups, epididymal sperm counts were reduced several months after end of exposure, i.e. at 10 months of age. Interestingly, the same pattern of effects was seen for paracetamol as for mixtures with diverse modes of action. Reduced sperm count was seen at a dose level reflecting human therapeutic exposure to paracetamol. Environmental chemical mixtures affected sperm count at the lowest mixture dose indicating an insufficient margin of safety for the most exposed humans. This causes concern for exposure of pregnant women to paracetamol as well as environmental endocrine disrupters.

Open access

Yusaku Mori, Hiroyuki Shimizu, Hideki Kushima, Tomomi Saito, Munenori Hiromura, Michishige Terasaki, Masakazu Koshibu, Hirokazu Ohtaki and Tsutomu Hirano

Nesfatin-1 is a novel anorexic peptide hormone that also exerts cardiovascular protective effects in rodent models. However, nesfatin-1 treatment at high doses also exerts vasopressor effects, which potentially limits its therapeutic application. Here, we evaluated the vasoprotective and vasopressor effects of nesfatin-1 at different doses in mouse models. Wild-type mice and those with the transgene nucleobindin-2, a precursor of nesfatin-1, were employed. Wild-type mice were randomly assigned to treatment with vehicle or nesfatin-1 at 0.2, 2.0 or 10 μg/kg/day (Nes-0.2, Nes-2, Nes-10, respectively). Subsequently, mice underwent femoral artery wire injury to induce arterial remodeling. After 4 weeks, injured arteries were collected for morphometric analysis. Compared with vehicle, nesfatin-1 treatments at 2.0 and 10 μg/kg/day decreased body weights and elevated plasma nesfatin-1 levels with no changes in systolic blood pressure. Furthermore, these treatments reduced neointimal hyperplasia without inducing undesirable remodeling in injured arteries. However, nesfatin-1 treatment at 0.2 μg/kg/day was insufficient to elevate plasma nesfatin-1 levels and showed no vascular effects. In nucleobindin-2-transgenic mice, blood pressure was slightly higher but neointimal area was lower than those observed in littermate controls. In cultured human vascular endothelial cells, nesfatin-1 concentration-dependently increased nitric oxide production. Additionally, nesfatin-1 increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, which was abolished by inhibiting liver kinase B1. We thus demonstrated that nesfatin-1 treatment at appropriate doses suppressed arterial remodeling without affecting blood pressure. Our findings indicate that nesfatin-1 can be a therapeutic target for improved treatment of peripheral artery disease.

Open access

Ranganathan R Rao, Harpal S Randeva, Sailesh Sankaranarayanan, Murthy Narashima, Matthias Möhlig, Hisham Mehanna and Martin O Weickert

-responder/control group of 12 patients who were retrospectively identified as having received no or insufficient treatment with vitamin D, defined as serum 25OHD levels remaining ≤50 nmol/l during the observation period. The observation period was comparable in patients