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Stephen A Martin, Kenneth A Philbrick, Carmen P Wong, Dawn A Olson, Adam J Branscum, Donald B Jump, Charles K Marik, Jonathan M DenHerder, Jennifer L Sargent, Russell T Turner and Urszula T Iwaniec

Mice are a commonly used model to investigate aging-related bone loss but, in contrast to humans, mice exhibit cancellous bone loss prior to skeletal maturity. The mechanisms mediating premature bone loss are not well established. However, our previous work in female mice suggests housing temperature is a critical factor. Premature cancellous bone loss was prevented in female C57BL/6J mice by housing the animals at thermoneutral temperature (where basal rate of energy production is at equilibrium with heat loss). In the present study, we determined if the protective effects of thermoneutral housing extend to males. Male C57BL/6J mice were housed at standard room temperature (22°C) or thermoneutral (32°C) conditions from 5 (rapidly growing) to 16 (slowly growing) weeks of age. Mice housed at room temperature exhibited reductions in cancellous bone volume fraction in distal femur metaphysis and fifth lumbar vertebra; these effects were abolished at thermoneutral conditions. Mice housed at thermoneutral temperature had higher levels of bone formation in distal femur (based on histomorphometry) and globally (serum osteocalcin), and lower global levels of bone resorption (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen) compared to mice housed at room temperature. Thermoneutral housing had no impact on bone marrow adiposity but resulted in higher abdominal white adipose tissue and serum leptin. The overall magnitude of room temperature housing-induced cancellous bone loss did not differ between male (current study) and female (published data) mice. These findings highlight housing temperature as a critical experimental variable in studies using mice of either sex to investigate aging-related changes in bone metabolism.

Open access

Kaisa K Ivaska, Maikki K Heliövaara, Pertti Ebeling, Marco Bucci, Ville Huovinen, H Kalervo Väänänen, Pirjo Nuutila and Heikki A Koistinen

not observed previously. Clowes et al . (30) used a 2 h hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp with high insulin infusion rate (80 mU/m 2 per min) and reported no significant change in bone formation and resorption markers, which is in line with our 2 h

Open access

Sylvia Thiele, Anke Hannemann, Maria Winzer, Ulrike Baschant, Heike Weidner, Matthias Nauck, Rajesh V Thakker, Martin Bornhäuser, Lorenz C Hofbauer and Martina Rauner

presented in x-fold increase relative to beta-actin. Analysis of sclerostin and bone formation and resorption markers in the serum and supernatant Pro-collagen type 1 N-terminal peptide (P1NP; IDS Immunodiagnostic Systems GmbH, Frankfurt am Main

Open access

K Amrein, A Papinutti, E Mathew, G Vila and D Parekh

delicate balance between bone formation and resorption ( 42 , 43 ). In a post hoc analysis of the VITdAL-ICU study, vitamin D3 did not have a significant effect on the increased levels of β-Crosslaps and osteocalcin during critical illness ( 44

Open access

Ann-Kristin Picke, Graeme Campbell, Nicola Napoli, Lorenz C Hofbauer and Martina Rauner

. ( https://doi.org/10.1111/dom.12189 ) 10.1111/dom.12189 169 Ljunggren Ö Bolinder J Johansson L Wilding J Langkilde AM Sjöström CD Sugg J Parikh S. Dapagliflozin has no effect on markers of bone formation and resorption or bone mineral density in