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  • Author: Violeta Anastasovska x
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Open access

Mirjana Kocova, Vesna Janevska and Violeta Anastasovska

Background

Testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) are found in 30–94% of adult males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We sought to explore TART appearance through yearly ultrasound examination of testes in young boys with CAH, and its association with metabolic control and genetic mutations.

Methods

Twenty-five boys with 21-hydroxylase deficiency in the age group 4–18 years diagnosed during the period 2001–2016 were included in the study. ACTH, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione and testosterone were measured at 4-month intervals. Growth and BMI were assessed at the time of evaluation. PCR/ACRS method was used for CYP21A2 gene analysis. Testicular ultrasound examination was performed yearly.

Results

TARTs were detected by ultrasound in 8 children at the age of 6–16 years (13.2 years average). Five had salt-wasting form, two had simple virilizing form and one had non-classic form of CAH. Significant differences in the17OHP and androstenedione levels were detected between the boys, adherent and non-adherent to therapy. Inadequate metabolic control was not different in boys with and without TART (11/17 and 5/8 respectively). No significant difference was detected in the distribution of genetic mutations or adherence to therapy between patients with and without TARTs. One patient had a mutation not reported thus far in TART and another developed leukemia.

Conclusion

TART is not rare in young boys with CAH, irrespective of the specific mutation or metabolic control. Ultrasound screening helps timely diagnosis and adjustment of therapy.

Open access

Nikolina Zdraveska, Maja Zdravkovska, Violeta Anastasovska, Elena Sukarova-Angelovska and Mirjana Kocova

Background

Diagnostic re-evaluation is important for all patients with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) for determining the etiology and identifying transient CH cases. Our study is a first thyroxine therapy withdrawal study conducted in Macedonian CH patients for a diagnostic re-evaluation. We aimed to evaluate the etiology of CH, the prevalence of transient CH and identify predictive factors for distinguishing between permanent (PCH) and transient CH (TCH).

Materials and methods

Patients with CH aged >3 years underwent a trial of treatment withdrawal for 4 weeks period. Thyroid function testing (TFT), ultrasound and Technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid scan were performed thereafter. TCH was defined when TFT remained within normal limits for at least 6-month follow-up. PCH was diagnosed when TFT was abnormal and classified according the imaging findings.

Results

42 (55%) patients had PCH and 34 (45.0%) patients had TCH. Thyroid agenesia was the most prevalent form in the PCH group. Patients with TCH had lower initial thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) values (P < 0.0001); higher serum thyroxine levels (P = 0.0023) and lower mean doses of levothyroxine during treatment period (P < 0.0001) than patients with PCH. Initial TSH level <30.5 IU/mL and levothyroxine dose at 3 years of age <2.6 mg/kg/day were a significant predictive factors for TCH; sensitivity 92% and 100%, specificity 75.6% and 76%, respectively.

Conclusion

TCH presents a significant portion of patients with CH. Initial TSH value and levothyroxine dose during treatment period has a predictive role in differentiating TCH from PCH. Earlier re-evaluation, between 2 and 3 years age might be considered in some patients requiring low doses of levothyroxine.