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Xingyan Liu Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, General Hospital of PLA Eastern Theater (Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command), Command, Nanjing, China

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Mei Xu Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, General Hospital of PLA Eastern Theater (Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command), Command, Nanjing, China

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Min Qian Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, General Hospital of PLA Eastern Theater (Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command), Command, Nanjing, China

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Lindong Yang Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, General Hospital of PLA Eastern Theater (Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command), Command, Nanjing, China

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The cytochrome P450 family 17 (CYP17) is associated with hyperandrogenism in women, and the association between CYP17 gene polymorphism and the risk of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is not definitive. In order to determine whether the CYP17 T/C (rs74357) gene polymorphism is an exposure risk for PCOS, a comprehensive meta-analysis summarizing 19 studies was performed. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95% CI were measured under five genetic models, and the stratified analyses by ethnicity, Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium, testosterone levels and BMI in controls were carried out to identify the causes of substantial heterogeneity. The overall results validated that the CYP17 T/C (rs74357) gene polymorphism was significantly associated with PCOS risk in four genetic models. Moreover, the outcomes of subgroup analysis by ethnicity indicated that the frequencies of the C allele of CYP17 T/C (rs74357) polymorphism were markedly higher in women from Asia than in Caucasians (T vs C: OR 0.85, 95% CI = 0.74–0.99, P < 0.05). Therefore, these findings suggested that the CYP17 T/C (rs74357) gene polymorphism played an indispensable part in increasing the susceptibility of PCOS when carrying the C allele, which proposed that the polymorphism of the CYP17 gene may be a predictive factor for the risk of PCOS or an important pathway in PCOS-associated metabolic and hormonal dysregulation.

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Jia Liu Department of Endocrinology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China

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Min Liu Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China

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Zhe Chen Department of Endocrinology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China

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Yumei Jia Department of Endocrinology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China

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Guang Wang Department of Endocrinology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China

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Objective

Autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) is the most common autoimmune thyroid disease. Longitudinal relaxation time mapping (T1-mapping) measured by MRI is a new technique for assessing interstitial fibrosis of some organs, such as heart and liver. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between T1-mapping value and thyroid function and determine the usefulness of T1-mapping in identifying thyroid destruction in AIT patients.

Methods

This case–control study recruited 57 drug-naïve AIT patients and 17 healthy controls. All participants were given thyroid MRI, and T1-mapping values were measured using a modified look-locker inversion-recovery sequence.

Results

AIT patients had significantly higher thyroid T1-mapping values than the healthy controls (1.077 ± 177 vs 778 ± 82.9 ms; P < 0.01). A significant increase in thyroid T1-mapping values was presented along with the increased severity of thyroid dysfunction (P < 0.01). Correlation analyses showed that increased thyroid T1-mapping values were associated with higher TSH and lower FT3 and FT4 levels (TSH: r = 0.75; FT3: r = −0.47; FT4: r = −0.72; all P < 0.01). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed a high diagnostic value of T1-mapping values for the degree of thyroid destruction (area under the curve was 0.95, 95% CI: 0.90–0.99, P < 0.01).

Conclusions

AIT patients have higher thyroid T1-mapping values than the healthy controls, and the T1-mapping values increased with the progression of thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid T1-mapping value might be a new index to quantitatively evaluate the degree of thyroid destruction in AIT patients.

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Shufei Zang Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai Fifth People’s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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Lei Shi Department of Neurology, Shanghai Fifth People’s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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Jinying Zhao Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai Fifth People’s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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Min Yang Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai Fifth People’s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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Jun Liu Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai Fifth People’s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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Heyuan Ding Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai Fifth People’s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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The aim of our study was to explore the diagnostic value of prealbumin to fibrinogen ratio (PFR) for predicting prognosis with the optimal cut-off value in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) patients. A total of 568 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients were enrolled in this study. The values including Toronto clinical neuropathy score (TCNS), nerve conduction velocity (NCV), vibration perception threshold (VPT), blood cells count, biochemical parameters, fibrinogen and PFR were recorded. The patients were divided into tertiles based on admission PFR value. First, clinical parameters were compared among the groups. Secondly, a logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed as the statistical model. The percentage of DPN, TCNS and VPT were significantly higher in the lowest PFR tertile than in the middle PFR tertile and the highest PFR tertile (P < 0.01–0.001). NCV was significantly lower in lowest PFR tertile than in the middle PFR tertile and the highest PFR tertile (P < 0.01–0.001). The Spearman correlation analysis showed that PFR was negatively correlated with TCNS and VPT (P < 0.001), while PFR was positively correlated with median motor NCV (P < 0.001), peroneal motor NCV (P < 0.001), median sensory NCV (P < 0.001), and peroneal sensory NCV (P < 0.001). After adjusting these potentially related factors, PFR was independently related to DPN (P = 0.007). The area under ROC curve was 0.627. This study finds the first evidence to suggest PFR may be the key component associated with DPN in T2DM, while PFR might underlie the pathophysiologic features of DPN.

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Sun Fei Wuxi Medical College of Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China

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Min Liu Wuxi Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, Wuxi, China

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Hu Shanshan Wuxi Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, Wuxi, China

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Ruijie Xie Department of Microsurgery, University of South China, Hengyang, China

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Wu Danni Wuxi Medical College of Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China

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Zhou Ningying Wuxi Medical College of Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China

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Background

Depression has become a multifaceted global health issue, with complex connections to obesity. Weight-adjusted-waist index (WWI) can effectively evaluate central obesity, but the relationship between WWI and depression has not been well studied. The study aims to investigate the potential correlation between these two health parameters.

Methods

According to the data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, this cross-sectional study used multiple regression analysis, subgroup analysis, and smooth curve fitting to explore the relationship between WWI and depression. The assessment ability of WWI was evaluated and compared to other obesity indicators using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve.

Results

This study analyzed 38,154 participants. Higher WWI is associated with higher depression scores (β = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.36–0.47). After adjusting for various confounding factors, the positive correlation between WWI and depression remained significant (P for trend < 0.0001). Nonlinear positive correlation was detected with a breakpoint of 11.14. ROC analysis shows that compared to other obesity indicators (ROCWWI = 0.593; ROCBMI = 0.584; and ROCWC = 0.581), the correlation between WWI and depression has better discrimination and accuracy. DII mediated 4.93%, SII mediated 5.08%, and sedentary mediated 0.35% of the total association between WWI and depression.

Conclusion

WWI levels were related to an increased likelihood of depression and showed a stronger relationship than BMI and waist circumference. Our findings indicated that WWI may serve as a simple anthropometric index to evaluate depression.

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Tsung-Hui Wu Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

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Guan-Yu Su Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

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Tsung-Yun Liu Institute of Food Safety and Health Risk Assessment, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

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Hsiang-Tsui Wang Institute of Food Safety and Health Risk Assessment, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan
Institute of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan
PhD Program in Toxicology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

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Chii-Min Hwu Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Faculty of Medicine, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan

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Acrolein, an unsaturated aldehyde, plays a pathological role in neurodegenerative diseases. However, less is known about its effects on peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of acrolein and diabetic peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. We recruited 148 ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes. Each participant underwent an assessment of the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument Physical Examination. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was defined as Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument Physical Examination score ≥ 2.5. Serum levels and urinary levels of acrolein protein conjugates were measured. Urinary acrolein protein conjugates-to-creatinine ratios were determined. Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy had significantly higher urinary acrolein protein conjugates-to-creatinine ratios than those without diabetic peripheral neuropathy (7.91, 95% CI: 5.96–10.50 vs 5.31, 95% CI: 4.21–6.68, P = 0.029). Logarithmic transformation of urinary acrolein protein conjugates-to-creatinine ratios was positively associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy in univariate logistic analysis, and the association remained significant in multivariate analysis (OR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.12–5.34, P = 0.025). In conclusion, urinary acrolein protein conjugates-to-creatinine ratio may act as a new biomarker for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. The involvement of acrolein in the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy warrants further investigation.

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Ren-Lei Ji Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA

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Lu Huang State Key Laboratory of Developmental Biology of Freshwater Fish, College of Life Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China

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Yin Wang Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA

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Ting Liu Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA

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Si-Yu Fan State Key Laboratory of Developmental Biology of Freshwater Fish, College of Life Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China

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Min Tao Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA
State Key Laboratory of Developmental Biology of Freshwater Fish, College of Life Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China

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Ya-Xiong Tao Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA

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Melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) is a regulator of energy homeostasis, and interaction of MC3R and melanocortin-2 receptor accessory protein 2 (MRAP2) plays a critical role in MC3R signaling of mammals. However, the physiological roles of MC3R in teleosts are not well understood. In this study, qRT-PCR was used to measure gene expression. Radioligand binding assay was used to study the binding properties of topmouth culter MC3R (caMC3R). Intracellular cAMP generation was determined by RIA, and caMC3R expression was quantified with flow cytometry. We showed that culter mc3r had higher expression in the CNS. All agonists could bind and stimulate caMC3R to increase dose dependently intracellular cAMP accumulation. Compared to human MC3R, culter MC3R showed higher constitutive activity, higher efficacies, and Rmax to alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), des-α-MSH, and adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Both caMRAP2a and caMRAP2b markedly decreased caMC3R basal cAMP production. However, only caMRAP2a significantly decreased cell surface expression, Bmax, and Rmax of caMC3R. Expression analysis suggested that MRAP2a and MRAP2b might be more important in regulating MC3R/MC4R signaling during larval period, and reduced mc3r, mc4r, and pomc expression might be primarily involved in modulation of MC3R/MC4R in adults. These data indicated that the cloned caMC3R was a functional receptor. MRAP2a and MRAP2b had different effects on expression and signaling of caMC3R. In addition, expression analysis suggested that MRAP2s, receptors, and hormones might play different roles in regulating culter development and growth.

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Zuyao Chen The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China
The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Xiaolin Zhong The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China
The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Weiqiang Tang The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Min Xia The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Chang Liu Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The First People's Hospital of Chenzhou, Chenzhou, China

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Yinping Guo The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Yan Yi The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Qingshan Jiang The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Xuyu Zu The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Jing Zhong The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Hengyang Medical School, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, China

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Background

Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) is extensively amplified in many tumors and accelerates tumor invasion and metastasis. However, the role and precise molecular mechanism by which FGF1 participates in thyroid cancer (TC) are still unclear.

Methods

Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction- and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of FGF1, high mobility group A (HMGA1), epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related factors, and FGFs in both TC tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to examine the expression of FGF1 and HMGA1. Immunofluorescence staining was used to detect the coexpression of FGF1 and HMGA1. Transwell and wound healing assays were conducted to evaluate the effects of FGF1 on the capacity of invasion and migration in cells.

Results

FGF1 was upregulated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues and cell lines and was relatively higher in PTC tissues with cervical lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, FGF1 promotes invasion and metastasis through the EMT pathway. Mechanistically, FGF1 promotes EMT through intracellular function independent of FGF receptors. Interestingly, we demonstrated that FGF1 could upregulate HMGA1 in TC cells, and the correlation of FGF1 and HMGA1 was positive in PTC tissues. FGF1 and HMGA1 had obvious colocalization in the nucleus. We further revealed that FGF1 promotes the invasion and migration of TC cells through the upregulation of HMGA1.

Conclusion

Intracellular FGF1 could promote invasion and migration in TC by mediating the expression of HMGA1 independent of FGF receptors, and FGF1 may be an effective therapeutic target in TC.

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Zi-Di Xu Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Wei Zhang Department of Children Health Care, Xiamen Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Xiamen, China

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Min Liu Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Huan-Min Wang Department of Surgical Oncology, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Pei-Pei Hui Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Xue-Jun Liang Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Jie Yan Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Yu-Jun Wu Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Yan-Mei Sang Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Cheng Zhu Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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Gui-Chen Ni Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Genetic and Metabolism, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children’s Health, Beijing, China

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This study aims to summarize and analyze the clinical manifestations, genetic characteristics, treatment modalities and long-term prognosis of congenital hyperinsulinemia (CHI) in Chinese children. Sixty children with CHI, who were treated at Beijing Children’s Hospital from January 2014 to August 2017, and their families, were selected as subjects. The CHI-related causative genes in children were sequenced and analyzed using second-generation sequencing technology. Furthermore, the genetic pathogenesis and clinical characteristics of Chinese children with CHI were explored. Among the 60 CHI children, 27 children (27/60, 45%) carried known CHI-related gene mutations: 16 children (26.7%) carried ABCC8 gene mutations, seven children (11.7%) carried GLUD1 gene mutations, one child carried GCK gene mutations, two children carried HNF4α gene mutations and one child carried HADH gene mutations. In these 60 patients, eight patients underwent 18F-L-DOPA PET scan for the pancreas, and five children were found to be focal type. The treatment of diazoxide was ineffective in these five patients, and hypoglycemia could be controlled after receiving partial pancreatectomy. In conclusion, ABCC8 gene mutation is the most common cause of CHI in Chinese children. The early genetic analysis of children’s families has an important guiding significance for treatment planning and prognosis assessment.

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Zeming Liu Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Di Hu Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Yihui Huang Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Sichao Chen Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Wen Zeng Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Ling Zhou Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Wei Zhou Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Min Wang Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Haifeng Feng Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Wei Wei Department of Pediatrics, St John Hospital and Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA

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Chao Zhang Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China

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Danyang Chen Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Liang Guo Department of Plastic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Objectives

Controversies regarding factors associated with distant metastasis in pediatric thyroid cancer remain among the scientific community. The aim of this study was to investigate factors influencing distant metastasis in pediatric thyroid cancer.

Methods

We reviewed 1376 patients (aged 2 to 18 years) with thyroid cancer treated between 2003 and 2014. Data collected and analyzed included sex, race, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, pathological type, number of tumor foci, tumor extension, T-stage, N-stage, surgical procedure and radiation. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to evaluate factors influencing distant metastasis of pediatric thyroid cancer.

Results

In the univariate analysis, factors influencing distant metastasis of thyroid cancer were age at diagnosis (P < 0.001), N-stage (P < 0.001), number of tumor foci (P = 0.003), tumor extension (P < 0.001) and T-stage (T1 vs T2 (P = 0.803), T3 (P < 0.001) and T4 (P < 0.001)). In multivariate analysis, factors influencing distant metastasis of thyroid cancer were age at diagnosis (P = 0.001), N-stage (P < 0.001) and T-stage (T1 vs T3 (P = 0.036) and T4 (P < 0.001)). Sex, race, year of diagnosis, pathological type, number of tumor foci, tumor extension, surgical procedure and radiation had no significant influence on distant metastasis (all P > 0.05). Furthermore, according to chi-squared test, younger pediatric thyroid cancer patients with higher T- and N-stages are more likely to have distant metastasis.

Conclusion

Age at diagnosis, T-stage and N-stage influence distant metastasis of thyroid cancer patients aged 2 to 18 years; accordingly, more radical treatments may need to be used for patients with those risk elements.

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Chun-feng Lu Department of Endocrinology, Affiliated Hospital 2 of Nantong University and First People’s Hospital of Nantong City, Nantong, China

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Xiao-qin Ge Department of Endocrinology, Affiliated Hospital 2 of Nantong University and First People’s Hospital of Nantong City, Nantong, China

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Yan Wang Department of Geriatrics, Affiliated Hospital 2 of Nantong University and First People’s Hospital of Nantong City, Nantong, China

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Jian-bin Su Department of Endocrinology, Affiliated Hospital 2 of Nantong University and First People’s Hospital of Nantong City, Nantong, China

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Xue-qin Wang Department of Endocrinology, Affiliated Hospital 2 of Nantong University and First People’s Hospital of Nantong City, Nantong, China

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Dong-mei Zhang Clinical Medicine Research Center, Affiliated Hospital 2 of Nantong University and First People’s Hospital of Nantong City, Nantong, China

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Feng Xu Department of Endocrinology, Affiliated Hospital 2 of Nantong University and First People’s Hospital of Nantong City, Nantong, China

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Wang-shu Liu Department of Endocrinology, Affiliated Hospital 2 of Nantong University and First People’s Hospital of Nantong City, Nantong, China

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Min Su Department of Endocrinology, Nantong Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nantong Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nantong, China

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Background

Prolonged heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval may reflect poor prognosis of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) levels are related to hyperglycemia, insulin resistance (IR) and inflammation, which may participate in diabetic complications. We investigated the association of serum ADA levels with prolonged QTc interval in a large-scale sample of patients with T2D.

Methods

In this cross-sectional study, a total of 492 patients with T2D were recruited. Serum ADA levels were determined by venous blood during fasting. QTc interval was estimated from resting 12-lead ECGs, and prolonged QTc interval was defined as QTc > 440 ms.

Results

In this study, the prevalence of prolonged QTc interval was 22.8%. Serum ADA levels were positively associated with QTc interval (r = 0.324, P < 0.0001). The proportion of participants with prolonged QTc interval increased significantly from 9.2% in the first tertile (T1) to 24.7% in the second tertile (T2) and 39.0% in the third tertile (T3) of ADA (P for trend < 0.001). After adjusting for other possible risk factors by multiple linear regression analysis, serum ADA level was still significantly associated with QTc interval (β = 0.217, t = 3.400, P < 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that female (OR 5.084, CI 2.379–10.864, P < 0.001), insulin-sensitizers treatment (OR 4.229, CI 1.290–13.860, P = 0.017) and ADA (OR 1.212, CI 1.094–1.343, P < 0.001) were independent contributors to prolonged QTc interval.

Conclusions

Serum ADA levels were independently associated with prolonged QTc interval in patients with T2D.

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