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  • Author: Jens Otto Lunde Jørgensen x
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Open access

Jakob Kirkegård, Dora Körmendiné Farkas, Jens Otto Lunde Jørgensen and Deirdre P Cronin-Fenton

Objective

The association between thyroid dysfunction and gastrointestinal cancer is unclear.

Design

We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study to examine this potential association.

Methods

We used Danish medical registries to assemble a nationwide population-based cohort of patients diagnosed with hyperthyroid or hypothyroid disease from 1978 to 2013. We computed standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with corresponding 95% CIs as measures of the relative risk of each cancer, comparing patients with thyroid dysfunction with that expected in the general population.

Results

We included 163,972 patients, of which 92,783 had hyperthyroidism and 71,189 had hypothyroidism. In general, we found an increased risk of all gastrointestinal cancers within the first year after thyroid disease diagnosis. After more than 5 years of follow-up, patients with hyperthyroidism had a slightly increased risk of pancreatic and gallbladder and biliary tract cancer. Patients with hypothyroidism had a slightly increased risk of stomach, anal, liver, gallbladder and biliary tract, and pancreatic cancer after more than 5 years of follow-up, but the observed numbers of cancers were in general similar to the expected.

Conclusions

The increased risks of all gastrointestinal cancers in the first year following hyper- or hypothyroidism diagnosis are likely due to detection bias. After more than 5 years of follow-up, there does not seem to be a consistent causal association between thyroid disease and gastrointestinal cancer.

Open access

Esben Thyssen Vestergaard, Morten B Krag, Morten M Poulsen, Steen B Pedersen, Niels Moller, Jens Otto Lunde Jorgensen and Niels Jessen

Objective

Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects.

Materials and methods

To study GH-independent effects of ghrelin, seven hypopituitary men undergoing replacement therapy with GH and hydrocortisone were given ghrelin (5 pmol/kg per min) and saline infusions for 300 min in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Circulating RBP4 levels were measured at baseline and during a hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamp on both study days. To study the direct effects of GH, nine healthy men were treated with GH (2 mg at 2200 h) and placebo for 8 days in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Serum RBP4 levels were measured before and after treatment, and insulin sensitivity was measured by the hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamp technique.

Results

Ghrelin acutely decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Serum RBP4 concentrations decreased in response to insulin infusion during the saline experiment (mg/l): 43.2±4.3 (baseline) vs 40.4±4.2 (clamp), P<0.001, but this effect was abrogated during ghrelin infusion (mg/l): 42.4±4.5 (baseline) vs 42.9±4.7 (clamp), P=0.73. In healthy subjects, serum RBP4 levels were not affected by GH administration (mg/l): 41.7±4.1 (GH) vs 43.8±4.6 (saline), P=0.09, although GH induced insulin resistance.

Conclusions

i) Serum RBP4 concentrations decrease in response to hyperinsulinemia, ii) ghrelin abrogates the inhibitory effect of insulin on circulating RBP4 concentrations, and iii) ghrelin as well as GH acutely induces insulin resistance in skeletal muscle without significant changes in circulating RBP4 levels.