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Shams Ali Baig S Ali Baig, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Kashish Malhotra K Malhotra, Department of Surgery, Rama Medical College Hospital and Research Centre Hapur, Hapur, India

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Josh Banerjee J Banerjee, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Mukunth Kowsik M Kowsik, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Khushi Kumar K Kumar, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Fazna Rahman F Rahman, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Syeda Sabbah Batul S Batul, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Mohammed Faraaz Saiyed M Saiyed, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Vardhan Venkatesh V Venkatesh, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Pranav Vishwanath Iyer P Vishwanath Iyer, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, B296DR, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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Punith Kempegowda P Kempegowda, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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YouTube® is one of the leading platforms for health information. However, the lack of regulation of content and quality raises concerns about accuracy and reliability. CoMICs (Concise Medical Information Cines) are evidenced-based short videos created by medical students and junior doctors and reviewed by experts to ensure clinical accuracy. We performed a systematic review to understand the impact of videos on knowledge and awareness about diabetes and PCOS. We then evaluated the quality of YouTube® videos about diabetes and PCOS using various validated quality assessment tools and compared these with CoMICs videos on the same topics. Quality assessment tools like DISCERN, JAMA benchmark criteria, and Global Quality Score (GQS) were employed. Some of the authors of this study also co-authored the creation of some of the CoMICs evaluated. Our study revealed that while videos effectively improve understanding of diabetes and PCOS, there are notable differences in quality and reliability of the videos on YouTube®. For diabetes, CoMICs videos had higher DISCERN scores (CoMICs vs YouTube®: 2.4 vs 1.6), superior reliability (p<0.01) and treatment quality (p<0.01), and met JAMA criteria for authorship (100% vs. 30.6%) and currency (100% vs. 53.1%). For PCOS, CoMICs had higher DISCERN scores (2.9 vs. 1.9), reliability (p<0.01), and treatment quality (p<0.01); and met JAMA criteria for authorship (100% vs. 34.0%) and currency (100% vs. 54.0%); and had higher GQS scores (4.0 vs 3.0). In conclusion, CoMICs outperformed other similar sources on YouTube® in providing reliable evidence-based medical information which may be used for patient education.

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