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  • Author: Anya Rothenbuhler x
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Emmanuelle Motte-Signoret, Anya Rothenbuhler, Stephan Gaillard, Najiba Lahlou, Cécile Teinturier, Regis Coutant and Agnès Linglart

Objective: To investigate whether low-dose mitotane (up to 2 g/day) could be a temporary therapeutic alternative to transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) in pediatric Cushing’s disease (CD).

Methods: 28 patients with CD aged 12.2 years [± 2.2] were referred to our center. We compared 9 patients treated with mitotane alone for at least 6 months to 13 patients cured after surgery. Primary outcomes were changes in growth velocity, body mass index (BMI) and pubertal development.

Results: (1) Mitotane improved growth velocity z-scores (-3.8 [±0.3] vs -0.2 [±0.6]), BMI z-scores (2.1 [±0.5] vs 1.2 [±0.5] SD) and pubertal development. After 1 year on mitotane, the mean BMI z-score was not significantly different in both groups of patients. (2) Control of cortisol secretion was delayed and inconsistent with mitotane used as monotherapy. (3) Side effects were similar to those previously reported, reversible and dose dependent: unspecific digestive symptoms, concentration or memory problems, physical exhaustion, adrenal insufficiency, and hepatitis. (4) In one patient, progressive growth of a pituitary adenoma was observed over 40 months of mitotane treatment, allowing selective adenomectomy by TSS.

Conclusions: Low-dose mitotane can restore growth velocity and pubertal development and decrease BMI in children with CD, even without optimal control of cortisol secretion. It may promote pituitary tumor growth thus facilitate second-line TSS. However, given its possibly life threatening side effects (transient adrenal insufficiency and hepatitis), and in the absence of any reliable follow-up procedures, this therapy may be difficult to manage and should always be initiated and monitored by specialized teams.

Open access

Emmanuelle Motte, Anya Rothenbuhler, Stephan Gaillard, Najiba Lahlou, Cécile Teinturier, Régis Coutant and Agnès Linglart

To investigate whether low-dose mitotane (up to 2 g/day) could be a temporary therapeutic alternative to transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) in pediatric Cushing’s disease (CD). Twenty-eight patients with CD aged 12.2 years (± 2.2) were referred to our center. We compared nine patients treated with mitotane alone for at least 6 months to 13 patients cured after surgery. Primary outcomes were changes in growth velocity, BMI and pubertal development. The following results were obtained: (1) Mitotane improved growth velocity z-scores (−3.8 (±0.3) vs −0.2 (±0.6)), BMI z-scores (2.1 (±0.5) vs 1.2 (±0.5) s.d.) and pubertal development. After 1 year on mitotane, the mean BMI z-score was not significantly different in both groups of patients. (2) Control of cortisol secretion was delayed and inconsistent with mitotane used as monotherapy. (3) Side effects were similar to those previously reported, reversible and dose dependent: unspecific digestive symptoms, concentration or memory problems, physical exhaustion, adrenal insufficiency and hepatitis. (4) In one patient, progressive growth of a pituitary adenoma was observed over 40 months of mitotane treatment, allowing selective adenomectomy by TSS. In conclusions, low-dose mitotane can restore growth velocity and pubertal development and decrease BMI in children with CD, even without optimal control of cortisol secretion. It may promote pituitary tumor growth thus facilitating second-line TSS. However, given its possibly life-threatening side effects (transient adrenal insufficiency and hepatitis), and in the absence of any reliable follow-up procedures, this therapy may be difficult to manage and should always be initiated and monitored by specialized teams.

Open access

Agnès Linglart, Martin Biosse-Duplan, Karine Briot, Catherine Chaussain, Laure Esterle, Séverine Guillaume-Czitrom, Peter Kamenicky, Jerome Nevoux, Dominique Prié, Anya Rothenbuhler, Philippe Wicart and Pol Harvengt

In children, hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is revealed by delayed walking, waddling gait, leg bowing, enlarged cartilages, bone pain, craniostenosis, spontaneous dental abscesses, and growth failure. If undiagnosed during childhood, patients with hypophosphatemia present with bone and/or joint pain, fractures, mineralization defects such as osteomalacia, entesopathy, severe dental anomalies, hearing loss, and fatigue. Healing rickets is the initial endpoint of treatment in children. Therapy aims at counteracting consequences of FGF23 excess, i.e. oral phosphorus supplementation with multiple daily intakes to compensate for renal phosphate wasting and active vitamin D analogs (alfacalcidol or calcitriol) to counter the 1,25-diOH-vitamin D deficiency. Corrective surgeries for residual leg bowing at the end of growth are occasionally performed. In absence of consensus regarding indications of the treatment in adults, it is generally accepted that medical treatment should be reinitiated (or maintained) in symptomatic patients to reduce pain, which may be due to bone microfractures and/or osteomalacia. In addition to the conventional treatment, optimal care of symptomatic patients requires pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of pain and joint stiffness, through appropriated rehabilitation. Much attention should be given to the dental and periodontal manifestations of HR. Besides vitamin D analogs and phosphate supplements that improve tooth mineralization, rigorous oral hygiene, active endodontic treatment of root abscesses and preventive protection of teeth surfaces are recommended. Current outcomes of this therapy are still not optimal, and therapies targeting the pathophysiology of the disease, i.e. FGF23 excess, are desirable. In this review, medical, dental, surgical, and contributions of various expertises to the treatment of HR are described, with an effort to highlight the importance of coordinated care.