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  • Author: Haozheng Ma x
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Peiwen Zheng School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, The Affiliated Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, China

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Fan Wang Beijing Hui-Long-Guan Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, China

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Hui Li Psychosomatic Medicine Research Division, Inner Mongolia Medical University, Huhhot, China

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Hanlu Chen School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, The Affiliated Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, China

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Mengtong Li School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, The Affiliated Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, China

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Haozheng Ma School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, The Affiliated Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, China

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Jue He School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, The Affiliated Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, China

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Li Chen School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, The Affiliated Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, China

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Yanlong Liu School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, The Affiliated Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, China

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Haiyun Xu School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, The Affiliated Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, China

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Objective

This study aimed to reveal associations between metabolic hormones in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and cigarette smoking-induced weight gain and to explore the underlying mechanism.

Methods

A total of 156 adult men were included, comprising active smokers and nonsmokers. In addition to demographic information and body mass index (BMI), plasma levels of ApoA1 and ApoB, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, cholesterol, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase in the participants were measured. Moreover, the metabolic hormones adiponectin, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), ghrelin, leptin, and orexin A, as well as the trace elements iron and zinc in CSF, were assessed.

Results

Compared to nonsmokers, active smokers showed higher BMI, and elevated CSF levels of FGF21, Zn, and Fe, but decreased levels of metabolic hormones adiponectin, ghrelin, leptin, and orexin A. Negative correlations existed between CSF FGF21 and ghrelin, between CSF Zn and ghrelin, as well as between CSF Fe and orexin A in active smokers. Furthermore, elevated CSF FGF21 and Zn predicted ghrelin level decrease in the smokers.

Conclusion

These data relate smoking-induced weight gain to its neurotoxic effect on the neurons that synthesize metabolic hormones such as adiponectin, ghrelin, leptin, or orexin A in the brain, by disrupting mitochondrial function and causing oxidative stress in the neurons.

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