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Ranganathan R Rao Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK

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Harpal S Randeva Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK
Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK

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Sailesh Sankaranarayanan Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK
Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK

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Murthy Narashima Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK
Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK

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Matthias Möhlig Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK

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Hisham Mehanna Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK

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Martin O Weickert Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK
Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Warwick Medical School, Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Head and Neck Studies and Education (InHANSE), Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK

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Introduction/background

Vitamin D deficiency further increases circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT), with potential detrimental effects on bone mass.

Methods

This was an observational clinical study in consecutive conservatively treated postmenopausal women (n=40) with pHPT and coexistent 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency (25OHD ≤50 nmol/l (≤20 ng/ml)). Patients who showed an increase in serum 25OHD above the threshold of vitamin D deficiency (>50 nmol/l; n=28) using treatment with various commonly prescribed vitamin D preparations were, for the purposes of statistical analyses, allocated to the treatment group. Patients who were retrospectively identified as having received no treatment with vitamin D and/or remained vitamin D deficient were considered as non-responders/controls (n=12). Adjusted calcium (adjCa), PTH and 25OHD concentrations were monitored in all subjects up to 54 months (mean observation period of 18±2 months).

Results

Prolonged increased vitamin D intake, regardless of the source (serum 25OHD, increase from 32.2±1.7 nmol/l at baseline to 136.4±11.6 nmol/l, P<0.0001), significantly reduced serum PTH (13.3±1.1 vs 10.5±1.0 pmol/l, P=0.0001), with no adverse effects on adjCa levels (2.60±0.03 vs 2.60±0.02 mmol/l, P=0.77) and renal function tests (P>0.73). In contrast, serum PTH remained unchanged (15.8±2.6 vs 16.3±1.9 pmol/l, P=0.64) in patients who remained vitamin D deficient, with a significant difference between groups in changes of PTH (P=0.0003). Intrapartial correlation analyses showed an independent negative correlation of changes in 25OHD with PTH levels (r ic=−0.41, P=0.014).

Conclusions

Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in various commonly prescribed preparations appeared to be safe and significantly reduced PTH levels by 21%.

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Sharon A Huish University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK
The University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Exeter, UK

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Carl Jenkinson The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

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Janet A Dunn The University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

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David J Meredith Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Exeter, UK

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Rosemary Bland The University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

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Martin Hewison The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

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Low serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is considered a consequence of elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and concomitant reduced activity of renal 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1). Current ESRD treatment strategies to increase serum calcium and suppress secondary hyperparathyroidism involve supplementation with vitamin D analogues that circumvent 1α-hydroxylase. This overlooks the potential importance of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency as a contributor to low serum 1,25(OH)2D. We investigated the effects of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) supplementation (40,000 IU for 12 weeks and maintenance dose of 20,000 IU fortnightly), on multiple serum vitamin D metabolites (25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D3 and 24,25(OH)2D3) in 55 haemodialysis patients. Baseline and 12 month data were compared using related-samples Wilcoxon signed rank test. All patients remained on active vitamin D analogues as part of routine ESRD care. 1,25(OH)2D3 levels were low at baseline (normal range: 60–120 pmol/L). Cholecalciferol supplementation normalised both serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D3. Median serum 25(OH)D increased from 35.1 nmol/L (IQR: 23.0–47.5 nmol/L) to 119.9 nmol/L (IQR: 99.5–143.3 nmol/L) (P < 0.001). Median serum 1,25(OH)2D3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 increased from 48.3 pmol/L (IQR: 35.9–57.9 pmol/L) and 3.8 nmol/L (IQR: 2.3–6.0 nmol/L) to 96.2 pmol/L (IQR: 77.1–130.6 pmol/L) and 12.3 nmol/L (IQR: 9–16.4 nmol/L), respectively (P < 0.001). A non-significant reduction in daily active vitamin D analogue dose occurred, 0.94 µmcg at baseline to 0.77 µmcg at 12 months (P = 0.73). The ability to synthesise 1,25(OH)2D3 in ESRD is maintained but is substrate dependent, and serum 25(OH)D was a limiting factor at baseline. Therefore, 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency in ESRD is partly a consequence of 25(OH)D deficiency, rather than solely due to reduced 1α-hydroxylase activity as suggested by current treatment strategies.

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Stan Ursem Department of Clinical Chemistry, Amsterdam Gastroenterology & Metabolism, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Endocrine Laboratory, Amsterdam, Netherlands

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Vito Francic Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology Lab Platform, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Martin Keppel University Institute for Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria

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Verena Schwetz Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology Lab Platform, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Christian Trummer Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology Lab Platform, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Marlene Pandis Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology Lab Platform, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Felix Aberer Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology Lab Platform, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Martin R Grübler Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology Lab Platform, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Nicolas D Verheyen Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Winfried März Synlab Academy, Synlab Holding Germany GmbH, München, Germany

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Andreas Tomaschitz Specialist Clinic of Rehabilitation Bad Gleichenberg, Bad Gleichenberg, Austria

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Stefan Pilz Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology Lab Platform, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Barbara Obermayer-Pietsch Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology Lab Platform, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria

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Annemieke C Heijboer Department of Clinical Chemistry, Amsterdam Gastroenterology & Metabolism, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Endocrine Laboratory, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Amsterdam Gastroenterology & Metabolism, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Endocrine Laboratory, Amsterdam, Netherlands

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Objective

PTH can be oxidised in vivo, rendering it biologically inactive. Non-oxidised PTH (n-oxPTH) may therefore give a better image of the hormonal status of the patient. While vitamin D supplementation decreases total PTH (tPTH) concentration, the effect on n-oxPTH concentration is unexplored. We investigated the effect of vitamin D on n-oxPTH concentration in comparison to tPTH and compared the correlations between parameters of calcium, bone and lipid metabolism with n-oxPTH and tPTH.

Methods

N-oxPTH was measured in 108 vitamin D-insufficient (25(OH)D <75 nmol/L) hypertensive patients, treated with vitamin D (2800 IE daily) or placebo for 8 weeks in the Styrian Vitamin D Hypertension Trial (NCT02136771). We calculated the treatment effect and performed correlation analyses of n-oxPTH and tPTH with parameters of calcium, bone and lipid metabolism and oxidative stress.

Results

After treatment, compared to placebo, 25(OH)D concentrations increased, tPTH decreased by 9% (P < 0.001), n-oxPTH by 7% (P = 0.025) and the ratio of n-oxPTH/tPTH increased (P = 0.027). Changes in phosphate and HDL concentration correlated with changes in n-oxPTH, but not tPTH.

Conclusions

tPTH and n-oxPTH decrease upon vitamin D supplementation. Our study suggests that vitamin D supplementation reduces the oxidation of PTH, as we observed a small but significant increase in the non-oxidised proportion of PTH upon treatment. In addition, we found that changes in phosphate and HDL concentration showed a relationship with changes in n-oxPTH, but not tPTH. This may be explained by the biological activity of n-oxPTH. Further research should be carried out to establish the clinical relevance of n-oxPTH.

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Haojie Zhang Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Yuke Cui Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Ruihua Dong Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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Wen Zhang Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Shihan Chen Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Heng Wan Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Chi Chen Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Yi Chen Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Yuying Wang Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Chunfang Zhu Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Bo Chen Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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Ningjian Wang Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Yingli Lu Institute and Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

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Background

Bone is thought to be the reservoir of the human lead burden, and vitamin D is associated with bone turnover. We aimed to explore whether exposure to lower 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels was associated with higher blood lead levels (BLLs) by increasing the bone turnover rate in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Methods

A total of 4103 type 2 diabetic men and postmenopausal women in Shanghai, China, were enrolled in 2018. Their 25(OH)D, β-C-terminal telopeptide (β-CTX), N-MID osteocalcin and procollagen type 1 N-peptide (P1NP) levels were detected. Their BLLs were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Mediation analyses were performed to identify the possible role that bone turnover played in the underlying mechanisms.

Results

In both the men and postmenopausal women, all three bone turnover markers were inversely associated with 25(OH)D and positively associated with the BLL (all P < 0.01) after adjusting for age, current smoking habits, metabolic parameters, duration of diabetes, vitamin D intake, and use of anti-osteoporosis medication. In the mediation analyses, none of the direct associations between 25(OH)D and BLL was significant for the three bone turnover markers, but all three bone turnover markers were found to be significant mediators of the indirect associations between 25(OH)D and BLL.

Conclusion

The association between vitamin D and BLL was fully mediated by bone turnover markers in type 2 diabetic patients (mediation effect). This finding suggested that vitamin D may protect against blood lead exposure from the bone reservoir by decreasing bone turnover in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

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Barbara J Boucher The Blizard Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK

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High vitamin D deficiency rates, with rickets and osteomalacia, have been common in South Asians (SAs) arriving in Britain since the 1950s with preventable infant deaths from hypocalcaemic status-epilepticus and cardiomyopathy. Vitamin D deficiency increases common SA disorders (type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease), recent trials and non-linear Mendelian randomisation studies having shown deficiency to be causal for both disorders. Ethnic minority, obesity, diabetes and social deprivation are recognised COVID-19 risk factors, but vitamin D deficiency is not, despite convincing mechanistic evidence of it. Adjusting analyses for obesity/ethnicity abolishes vitamin D deficiency in COVID-19 risk prediction, but both factors lower serum 25(OH)D specifically. Social deprivation inadequately explains increased ethnic minority COVID-19 risks. SA vitamin D deficiency remains uncorrected after 70 years, official bodies using ‘education’, ‘assimilation’ and ‘diet’ as ‘proxies’ for ethnic differences and increasing pressures to assimilate. Meanwhile, English rickets was abolished from ~1940 by free ‘welfare foods’ (meat, milk, eggs, cod liver oil), for all pregnant/nursing mothers and young children (<5 years old). Cod liver oil was withdrawn from antenatal clinics in 1994 (for excessive vitamin A teratogenicity), without alternative provision. The take-up of the 2006 ‘Healthy-Start’ scheme of food-vouchers for low-income families with young children (<3 years old) has been poor, being inaccessible and poorly publicised. COVID-19 pandemic advice for UK adults in ‘lockdown’ was ‘400 IU vitamin D/day’, inadequate for correcting the deficiency seen winter/summer at 17.5%/5.9% in White, 38.5%/30% in Black and 57.2%/50.8% in SA people in representative UK Biobank subjects when recruited ~14 years ago and remaining similar in 2018. Vitamin D inadequacy worsens many non-skeletal health risks. Not providing vitamin D for preventing SA rickets and osteomalacia continues to be unacceptable, as deficiency-related health risks increase ethnic health disparities, while abolishing vitamin D deficiency would be easier and more cost-effective than correcting any other factor worsening ethnic minority health in Britain.

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Laura P B Elbers Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Center Slotervaart, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

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Marije Wijnberge Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Center Slotervaart, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Laboratory of Experimental Intensive Care and Anesthesiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

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Joost C M Meijers Department of Experimental Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Department of Plasma Proteins, Sanquin Research, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

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Dennis C W Poland Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Medical Center Slotervaart, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

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Dees P M Brandjes Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Center Slotervaart, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

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Eric Fliers Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

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Victor E A Gerdes Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Center Slotervaart, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

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Introduction

Abnormal coagulation tests have been observed in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) suggesting a prothrombotic effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Vitamin D deficiency (VIDD) is the most frequent cause of secondary HPT. Aim of our study was to investigate the influence of HPT secondary to moderate-to-severe VIDD and vitamin D replacement on the coagulation and fibrinolysis system.

Subjects and methods

Prospective cohort study of patients with vitamin D <25 nmol/L with and without HPT, and a control group of patients on vitamin D suppletion. At baseline and after 2 months of vitamin D suppletion (900,000 IU in 2 months), endocrine and coagulation markers were measured.

Results

59 patients with VIDD of which 34 had secondary HPT and 36 controls were included. After 2 months of suppletion, vitamin D increased by 399% (VIDD with HPT), 442% (all patients with VIDD) and 6% (controls). PTH decreased by 34% (VIDD with HPT, P < 0.01 for decrease), 32% (all VIDD, P < 0.01) and increased by 8% in the controls (P-values: <0.01 for relative changes between VIDD with HPT or all VIDD patients vs controls). Relative changes in PT, aPTT, fibrinogen, Von Willebrand factor, factors VII, VIII and X, thrombin generation, TAFI, clot-lysis time and d-dimer were not different between patients with VIDD with HPT or all VIDD vs controls.

Discussion

Secondary HPT due to VIDD does not have a prothrombotic effect. In contrast with previous reports, PTH does not seem to influence coagulation or fibrinolysis, which is relevant because of the high prevalence of VIDD.

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Melissa Braga Department of Internal Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, USA

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Zena Simmons Department of Health & Life Sciences, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, USA

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Keith C Norris Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA

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Monica G Ferrini Department of Internal Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, USA
Department of Health & Life Sciences, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, USA
Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA

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Jorge N Artaza Department of Internal Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, USA
Department of Health & Life Sciences, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, USA
Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA

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Skeletal muscle wasting is a serious disorder associated with health conditions such as aging, chronic kidney disease and AIDS. Vitamin D is most widely recognized for its regulation of calcium and phosphate homeostasis in relation to bone development and maintenance. Recently, vitamin D supplementation has been shown to improve muscle performance and reduce the risk of falls in vitamin D deficient older adults. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanism(s) or the role it plays in myogenic differentiation. We examined the effect of 1,25-D3 on myogenic cell differentiation in skeletal muscle derived stem cells. Primary cultures of skeletal muscle satellite cells were isolated from the tibialis anterior, soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of 8-week-old C57/BL6 male mice and then treated with 1,25-D3. The efficiency of satellite cells isolation determined by PAX7+ cells was 81%, and they expressed VDR. Incubation of satellite cells with 1,25-D3 induces increased expression of: (i) MYOD, (ii) MYOG, (iii) MYC2, (iv) skeletal muscle fast troponin I and T, (v) MYH1, (vi) IGF1 and 2, (vii) FGF1 and 2, (viii) BMP4, (ix) MMP9 and (x) FST. It also promotes myotube formation and decreases the expression of MSTN. In conclusion, 1,25-D3 promoted a robust myogenic effect on satellite cells responsible for the regeneration of muscle after injury or muscle waste. This study provides a mechanistic justification for vitamin D supplementation in conditions characterized by loss of muscle mass and also in vitamin D deficient older adults with reduced muscle mass and strength, and increased risk of falls.

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Karoline Winckler Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology

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Lise Tarnow Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology
Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology
Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology

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Louise Lundby-Christensen Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology
Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology

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Thomas P Almdal Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology
Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology

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Niels Wiinberg Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology

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Pia Eiken Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology
Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology

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Trine W Boesgaard Department of Cardiology, Department of Research, Institute of Clinical Studies, Clinical Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Endocrinology

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the CIMT trial group
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Despite aggressive treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) still have increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of this study was to examine the cross-sectional association between total (25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D)) and risk of CVD in patients with T2D. Secondary objective was to examine the association between 25(OH)D and bone health. A Danish cohort of patients with T2D participating in a randomised clinical trial were analysed. In total 415 patients (68% men, age 60±9 years (mean±s.d.), duration of diabetes 12±6 years), including 294 patients (71%) treated with insulin. Carotid intima–media thickness (IMT) and arterial stiffness (carotid artery distensibility coefficient (DC) and Young's elastic modulus (YEM)) were measured by ultrasound scan as indicators of CVD. Bone health was assessed by bone mineral density and trabecular bone score measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. In this cohort, 214 patients (52%) were vitamin D deficient (25(OH)D <50 nmol/l). Carotid IMT was 0.793±0.137 mm, DC was 0.0030±0.001 mmHg, YEM was 2354±1038 mmHg and 13 (3%) of the patients were diagnosed with osteoporosis. A 25(OH)D level was not associated with carotid IMT or arterial stiffness (P>0.3) or bone health (P>0.6) after adjustment for CVD risk factors. In conclusion, 25(OH)D status was not associated with carotid IMT, arterial stiffness or bone health in this cohort of patients with T2D. To explore these associations and the association with other biomarkers further, multicentre studies with large numbers of patients are required.

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Rong Xu Center for Endocrine Metabolism and Immune Diseases, Lu He Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
Beijing Key Laboratory of Diabetes Research and Care, Beijing, China

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Difei Lian Center for Endocrine Metabolism and Immune Diseases, Lu He Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
Beijing Key Laboratory of Diabetes Research and Care, Beijing, China

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Yan Xie Center for Endocrine Metabolism and Immune Diseases, Lu He Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
Beijing Key Laboratory of Diabetes Research and Care, Beijing, China

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Lin Mu Center for Endocrine Metabolism and Immune Diseases, Lu He Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
Beijing Key Laboratory of Diabetes Research and Care, Beijing, China

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Yali Wu Center for Endocrine Metabolism and Immune Diseases, Lu He Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
Beijing Key Laboratory of Diabetes Research and Care, Beijing, China

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Zhilei Chen Center for Endocrine Metabolism and Immune Diseases, Lu He Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
Beijing Key Laboratory of Diabetes Research and Care, Beijing, China

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Baoyu Zhang Center for Endocrine Metabolism and Immune Diseases, Lu He Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
Beijing Key Laboratory of Diabetes Research and Care, Beijing, China

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Osteoporosis (OP) is a systemic bone disease in which bone density and quality decrease and bone fragility increases due to a variety of causes, making it prone to fractures. The development of OP is closely related to oxidative stress. Uric acid (UA) is the end product of purine metabolism in the human body. Extracellular UA has antioxidant properties and is thought to have a protective effect on bone metabolism. However, the process of UA degradation can lead to intracellular oxidative stress, which together with UA-induced inflammatory factors, leads to increased bone destruction. In addition, UA can inhibit vitamin D production, resulting in secondary hyperparathyroidism and further exacerbating UA-associated bone loss. This review summarizes the relationship between serum UA levels and bone mineral density, bone turnover markers, and so on, in the hope of providing new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of OP.

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Agnès Linglart Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Martin Biosse-Duplan Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Karine Briot Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Catherine Chaussain Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Laure Esterle Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Séverine Guillaume-Czitrom Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Peter Kamenicky Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Jerome Nevoux Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Dominique Prié Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Anya Rothenbuhler Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Philippe Wicart Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France
Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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Pol Harvengt Service d'Endocrinologie et Diabétologie de l'Enfant, Service de Pédiatrie générale – Consultation de rhumatologie, Service d'Endocrinologie et des Maladies de la Reproduction, Service d'ORL et chirurgie cervico-maxillo-faciale, Université Paris 11, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares du Métabolisme du Calcium et du Phosphore, Service d'Odontologie-Maladies Rares Hôpital Bretonneau 2 rue Carpeaux, Université Paris Descartes 12 Rue de l'École de Médecine, Service Rhumatologie B Hôpital Cochin, Centre de Référence des Maladies Rares des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires Rares de l'Enfant, Service d'explorations fonctionnelles rénales, Service de Chirurgie infantile orthopédique, Association de patients RVRH-XLH, Hôpital Bicêtre, APHP, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France

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In children, hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is revealed by delayed walking, waddling gait, leg bowing, enlarged cartilages, bone pain, craniostenosis, spontaneous dental abscesses, and growth failure. If undiagnosed during childhood, patients with hypophosphatemia present with bone and/or joint pain, fractures, mineralization defects such as osteomalacia, entesopathy, severe dental anomalies, hearing loss, and fatigue. Healing rickets is the initial endpoint of treatment in children. Therapy aims at counteracting consequences of FGF23 excess, i.e. oral phosphorus supplementation with multiple daily intakes to compensate for renal phosphate wasting and active vitamin D analogs (alfacalcidol or calcitriol) to counter the 1,25-diOH-vitamin D deficiency. Corrective surgeries for residual leg bowing at the end of growth are occasionally performed. In absence of consensus regarding indications of the treatment in adults, it is generally accepted that medical treatment should be reinitiated (or maintained) in symptomatic patients to reduce pain, which may be due to bone microfractures and/or osteomalacia. In addition to the conventional treatment, optimal care of symptomatic patients requires pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of pain and joint stiffness, through appropriated rehabilitation. Much attention should be given to the dental and periodontal manifestations of HR. Besides vitamin D analogs and phosphate supplements that improve tooth mineralization, rigorous oral hygiene, active endodontic treatment of root abscesses and preventive protection of teeth surfaces are recommended. Current outcomes of this therapy are still not optimal, and therapies targeting the pathophysiology of the disease, i.e. FGF23 excess, are desirable. In this review, medical, dental, surgical, and contributions of various expertises to the treatment of HR are described, with an effort to highlight the importance of coordinated care.

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