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Elizaveta Mamedova, Natalya Mokrysheva, Evgeny Vasilyev, Vasily Petrov, Ekaterina Pigarova, Sergey Kuznetsov, Nikolay Kuznetsov, Liudmila Rozhinskaya, Galina Melnichenko, Ivan Dedov, and Anatoly Tiulpakov

symptoms) (reviewed in 3 ). To date, the following familial syndromes associated with PHPT are known: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), type 2A (MEN2A), type 4 (MEN4), hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome (HPT-JT), familial hypocalciuric

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Kate E Lines, Mahsa Javid, Anita A C Reed, Gerard V Walls, Mark Stevenson, Michelle Simon, Kreepa G Kooblall, Sian E Piret, Paul T Christie, Paul J Newey, Ann-Marie Mallon, and Rajesh V Thakker

Introduction Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet and anterior pituitary tumours. In addition, some patients may also develop adrenal

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Jes Sloth Mathiesen, Jens Peter Kroustrup, Peter Vestergaard, Per Løgstrup Poulsen, Åse Krogh Rasmussen, Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen, Sten Schytte, Stefano Christian Londero, Henrik Baymler Pedersen, Christoffer Holst Hahn, Jens Bentzen, Sören Möller, Mette Gaustadnes, Maria Rossing, Finn Cilius Nielsen, Kim Brixen, Christian Godballe, and Danish Thyroid Cancer Group (DATHYRCA)

Calcitonine . Clinical Endocrinology 1998 48 265 – 273 . ( https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2265.1998.00392.x ) 10.1046/j.1365-2265.1998.00392.x 6 Raue F. German medullary thyroid carcinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia registry. German MTC/MEN Study

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Katerina Saltiki, Elli Anagnostou, George Simeakis, Sofia Kouki, Anastasia Angelopoulou, Leda Sarika, Alexandra Papathoma, and Maria Alevizaki

Introduction Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) accounts for 5–10% of all thyroid malignancies. About 25% of MTCs are familial (fMTC) and are described as multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes: MEN2A (associated with pheochromocytoma and

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Jes Sloth Mathiesen, Jens Peter Kroustrup, Peter Vestergaard, Kirstine Stochholm, Per Løgstrup Poulsen, Åse Krogh Rasmussen, Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen, Sten Schytte, Stefano Christian Londero, Henrik Baymler Pedersen, Christoffer Holst Hahn, Bjarki Ditlev Djurhuus, Jens Bentzen, Sören Möller, Mette Gaustadnes, Maria Rossing, Finn Cilius Nielsen, Kim Brixen, Anja Lisbeth Frederiksen, Christian Godballe, and the Danish Thyroid Cancer Group (DATHYRCA)

approximately 75% and 25%, respectively. HMTC occurs as part of the autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndromes, multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A and MEN2B. MEN2A and MEN2B account for approximately 95% and 5% of all MEN2 patients, respectively. MEN2A

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Xinlei Chen, Liru Hu, Caojie Liu, Guangcheng Ni, and Yuwei Zhang

with higher prevalence of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) ( P  < 0.001), a rare hereditary syndrome expressing a variety of mainly endocrine neoplasias including pheochromocytomas ( 17 ). Table 2 Patient and tumor characteristics of

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Malgorzata Oczko-Wojciechowska, Agnieszka Czarniecka, Tomasz Gawlik, Barbara Jarzab, and Jolanta Krajewska

( 1 ). Hereditary type, diagnosed in 20–30% of patients, is associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndrome (MEN 2), inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. Depends on the localization of the mutation in the RET proto-oncogene, MEN2

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Carina Hasenoehrl, Gert Schwach, Nassim Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Robert Fuchs, Nadine Kretschmer, Rudolf Bauer, and Roswitha Pfragner

. The remaining 20–30% are hereditary forms that are inherited in an autosomal-dominant pattern, either as part of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2A (MEN2A) or 2B (MEN2B), or without any other associated endocrinopathies as familial medullary

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Cheng Han Ng, Yip Han Chin, Marcus Hon Qin Tan, Jun Xuan Ng, Samantha Peiling Yang, Jolene Jiayu Kiew, and Chin Meng Khoo

more prevalent in both elderly and female patients ( 1 ) and is mainly caused by parathyroid adenoma, but can also be due to parathyroid hyperplasia, parathyroid carcinoma, and rare genetic abnormalities such as multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN

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A Al-Sharefi, P Perros, and R A James

Introduction Phaeochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PHAEO/PG) are chromaffin cell tumours, which can occur sporadically or as part of other hereditary syndromes including multiple endocrine neoplasia 2 (MEN-2), Von Hippel–Lindau syndrome (VHL) and