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Manjeetkaur Sehemby, Prachi Bansal, Vijaya Sarathi, Ashwini Kolhe, Kanchan Kothari, Swati Jadhav-Ramteke, Anurag R Lila, Tushar Bandgar and Nalini S Shah

Literature on virilising ovarian tumors (VOTs) is limited to case reports and series reporting single pathological type. We have analyzed the clinical, hormonal, radiological, histological, management and outcome data of VOT. This retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary health care center from Western India. Consecutive patients with VOT presenting to our endocrine center between 2002 and 2017 were included. Our study included 13 patients of VOT. Out of 13 patients, two were postmenopausal. All patients in the reproductive age group had secondary amenorrhea except one who presented with primary amenorrhea. Modified F and G score (mFG) at presentation was 24 ± 4.3 and all patients had severe hirsutism (mFG ≥15). Change in voice (n = 11) and clitoromegaly (n = 7) were the other most common virilising symptoms. Duration of symptoms varied from 4 to 48 months. Median serum total testosterone level at presentation was 5.6 ng/mL with severe hyperandrogenemia (serum testosterone ≥2 ng/mL) but unsuppressed gonadotropins in all patients. Transabdominal ultrasonography (TAS) detected VOT in all except one. Ten patients underwent unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy whereas three patients (peri- or postmenopausal) underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Seven patients had Sertoli Leydig cell tumor, three had steroid cell tumor and two had Leydig cell tumor and one had miscellaneous sex cord stromal tumor. All patients had normalization of serum testosterone after tumor excision. In conclusion, VOTs present with severe hyperandrogenism and hyperandrogenemia. Sertoli Leydig cell tumor is the most common histological subtype. Surgery is the treatment of choice with good surgical outcome.

Open access

Ravikumar Shah, Anurag R Lila, Ramteke-Swati Jadhav, Virendra Patil, Abhishek Mahajan, Sushil Sonawane, Puja Thadani, Anil Dcruz, Prathamesh Pai, Munita Bal, Subhada Kane, Nalini Shah and Tushar Bandgar

Tumor-induced osteomalacia in the head and neck region remains a challenging diagnosis to manage. Literature pertaining to management and outcome details remains sparse. We describe two cohorts: cohort 1 included seven patients from a single center in Western India with tumors located in paranasal sinuses (n = 3), intracranial (n = 2) and maxilla (n = 2). The unique features from our series is the management of persistent disease with radiation therapy (n = 2) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) (n = 1). Cohort two has 163 patients identified from 109 publications for systematic review. Paranasal sinuses, mandible, intracranial disease, maxilla and oral cavity, in descending order, are reportedly common tumor sites. Within this cohort, mean age was 46 ± 14 years at presentation with 44.1% having local symptoms. Duration of symptoms varied from 1 to 240 months. Pre-surgery mean serum phosphorus was 1.4 ± 0.4 mg/dL and median FGF-23 levels were 3.6 (IQR:1.8–6.8) times of normal upper limit of normal. Majority (97.5%) were managed primarily with surgical excision; however, primary radiotherapy (n = 2) and surgery combined with radiotherapy (n = 2) were also reported. Twenty patients had persistent disease while nine patients had recurrence, more commonly noted with intracranial and oral cavity tumors. Surgery was the most common second mode of treatment employed succeeded by radiotherapy. Four patients had metastatic disease. The most common histopathological diagnosis reported is PMT mixed connective tissue, while the newer terminology ‘PMT mixed epithelial and connective tissue type’ has been described in 15 patients.