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  • Author: Enrique Gallego-Colon x
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Agnieszka Kosowska, Enrique Gallego-Colon, Wojciech Garczorz, Agnieszka Kłych-Ratuszny, Mohammad Reza F Aghdam, Michał Woz´niak, Andrzej Witek, Agnieszka Wróblewska-Czech, Anna Cygal, Jerzy Wojnar and Tomasz Francuz

Diabetes and cancer are prevalent diseases whose incidence is increasing globally. Diabetic women have a moderate risk increase in ovarian cancer, suggested to be due to an interaction between these two disorders. Furthermore, patients manifesting both diseases have associated worse prognosis, reduced survival and shorter relapse-free survival. According to current recommendations, incretin drugs such as Exenatide, a synthetic analog of Exendin-4, and Liraglutide are used as therapy for the type 2 diabetes (T2D). We studied the effects of GLP-1 and Exendin-4 on migration, apoptosis and metalloproteinase production in two human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV-3 and CAOV-3). Exendin-4 inhibited migration and promoted apoptosis through caspase 3/7 activation. Exendin-4 also modulated the expression of key metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2). Vascular endothelial cells, which contribute to the formation and progression of metastasis, were also analyzed. TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells from iliac artery after Exendin-4 treatment showed reduced production of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1). Additionally, incretin treatment inhibited activation of apoptosis in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells. In the same experiment, MMPs (MMP-1 and MMP-9), which are relevant for tumor development, were also reduced. Our study demonstrated that incretin drugs may reduce cancer cell proliferation and dissemination potential, hence limiting the risk of metastasis in epithelial ovarian cancer.