Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 458 items for

  • Abstract: adiponectin x
  • Abstract: Beta x
  • Abstract: diabetes x
  • Abstract: diabetic x
  • Abstract: Glucagon x
  • Abstract: glucose x
  • Abstract: Hyperglycemia x
  • Abstract: Hypoglycemia x
  • Abstract: Insulin x
  • Abstract: Langerhans x
  • Abstract: Pancreas x
  • Abstract: prediabetes x
  • Abstract: metabo* x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Sakina H Bharmal, Wandia Kimita, Juyeon Ko, and Maxim S Petrov

Objective

Early identification of individuals at high risk for metabolic derangements after an attack of acute pancreatitis (AP) is critical with a view to tertiary preventing of this disease. The aim was to investigate whether fasting pancreatic and gut hormones at baseline were predictive of future risk of new-onset prediabetes after acute pancreatitis (NOPAP) in individuals with non-necrotising AP.

Methods

This was a prospective longitudinal cohort study that included 69 consecutive non-diabetic participants with AP, of whom 55% (n = 38) had normoglycaemia both at baseline and during follow-up, 25% (n = 17) had prediabetes both at baseline and during follow-up, and 20% (n = 14) were normoglycaemic at baseline but developed NOPAP during follow-up. The associations between the study groups and circulating fasting levels of pancreatic and gut hormones (insulin, glucagon, C-peptide, amylin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1, pancreatic polypeptide, and peptide YY) were studied using multinomial regression in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses.

Results

Elevated plasma insulin and glucagon at baseline were significantly associated with NOPAP (adjusted odds ratio 1.99, 95% CI 1.01 to 3.92 and adjusted odds ratio 3.44, 95% CI 1.06 to 11.19, respectively). The same hormones had no significant association with antecedent prediabetes in AP. The other studied hormones were not significantly associated with the study groups.

Conclusions

Normoglycaemic AP individuals with elevated fasting levels of insulin and glucagon at baseline constitute a high-risk group for future NOPAP.

Open access

Xun Gong, Lili You, Feng Li, Qingyu Chen, Chaogang Chen, Xiaoyun Zhang, Xiuwei Zhang, Wenting Xuan, Kan Sun, Guojuan Lao, Chuan Wang, Yan Li, Mingtong Xu, Meng Ren, and Li Yan

Objective

Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived hormone with an important role in glucose metabolism. The present study explored the effect of adiponectin in diverse population groups on pre-diabetes and newly diagnosed diabetes.

Methods

A total of 3300 individuals were enrolled and their data were collected in the analyses dataset from December 2018 to October 2019. Cluster analysis was conducted based on age, BMI, waistline, body fat, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, and glycosylated hemoglobin 1c. Cluster analysis divided the participants into four groups: a young-healthy group, an elderly-hypertension group, a high glucose–lipid group, and an obese group. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% CIs were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis.

Results

Compared with the first quartile of adiponectin, the risk of pre-diabetes of fourth quartile was decreased 61% (aOR = 0.39, 95% CI (0.20–0.73)) in the young-healthy group; and the risk of diabetes of fourth quartile was decreased 85% (aOR = 0.15, 95% CI (0.02–0.67)) in the obese group. There were no significant correlations between the adiponectin level and diabetes/pre-diabetes in the other two groups. Additionally, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that adiponectin could significantly improve the diagnosis based on models in the young-healthy group (from 0.640 to 0.675) and the obese group (from 0.714 to 0.761).

Conclusions

Increased adiponectin levels were associated with decreased risk of pre-diabetes in the young-healthy population, and with a decreased the risk of diabetes in the obese population. An increased adiponectin level is an independent protective factor for pre-diabetes and diabetes in a specific population in south China.

Open access

Xiang Hu, Qiao Zhang, Tian-Shu Zeng, Jiao-Yue Zhang, Jie Min, Sheng-Hua Tian, Hantao Huang, Miaomiao Peng, Nan Zhang, Mengjiao Li, Qing Wan, Fei Xiao, Yan Chen, Chaodong Wu, and Lu-Lu Chen

Objective

To explore the influence by not performing an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in Han Chinese over 40 years.

Design

Overall, 6682 participants were included in the prospective cohort study and were followed up for 3 years.

Methods

Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h post-load plasma glucose (2h-PG), FPG and 2h-PG (OGTT), and HbA1c testing using World Health Organization (WHO) or American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria were employed for strategy analysis.

Results

The prevalence of diabetes is 12.4% (95% CI: 11.6–13.3), while the prevalence of prediabetes is 34.1% (95% CI: 32.9–35.3) and 56.5% (95% CI: 55.2–57.8) using WHO and ADA criteria, respectively. 2h-PG determined more diabetes individuals than FPG and HbA1c. The testing cost per true positive case of OGTT is close to FPG and less than 2h-PG or HbA1c. FPG, 2h-PG and HbA1c strategies would increase costs from complications for false-positive (FP) or false-negative (FN) results compared with OGTT. Moreover, the least individuals identified as normal by OGTT at baseline developed (pre)diabetes, and the most prediabetes individuals identified by HbA1c or FPG using ADA criteria developed diabetes.

Conclusions

The prevalence of isolated impaired glucose tolerance and isolated 2-h post-load diabetes were high, and the majority of individuals with (pre)diabetes were undetected in Chinese Han population. Not performing an OGTT results in underdiagnosis, inadequate developing risk assessment and probable cost increases of (pre)diabetes in Han Chinese over 40 years and great consideration should be given to OGTT in detecting (pre)diabetes in this population. Further population-based prospective cohort study of longer-term effects is necessary to investigate the risk assessment and cost of (pre)diabetes.

Open access

Mojca Jensterle, Nika Aleksandra Kravos, Simona Ferjan, Katja Goricar, Vita Dolzan, and Andrej Janez

Objective

Long-term efficacy of metformin in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) apart from in those with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes remains unproven. We aimed to evaluate the impact of metformin in overweight-obese patients with PCOS and normal baseline glycemic homeostasis.

Methods

A 10-year longitudinal follow-up of a retrospective cohort comprising 159 patients with PCOS defined by Rotterdam criteria, BMI ≥25 kg/m2 and normal initial glucose homeostasis (age 28.4 ± 6.4 years, BMI 34.9 ± 6.6 kg/m2) that had been receiving metformin 1000 mg BID. Collection data contained 6085 time-points including anthropometric, hormonal and metabolic parameters.

Results

After the first year body mass (BM) decreased for 3.9 ± 6.8 kg (P < 0.001) and remained stable during the following 3 years. Menstrual frequency (MF) increased to 3.0 ± 3.9 bleeds/year (P < 0.001) after first year to over 11 bleeds/year in the following years. The total testosterone and androstenedione decreased to 15.4 ± 47.9% and 11.3 ± 46.4% within first year, with further decrease in total testosterone and androstenedione to 37.8 ± 61.8 and 24.8 ± 40.5% at the fifth year of the follow-up. The total conversion rate to prediabetes and diabetes was extremely low throughout observation period. Less than 25% of patients continued with metformin for more than 5 years with further dropout to only 6% on metformin therapy at the tenth year of follow-up.

Conclusions

Long-term metformin treatment of overweight-obese women with PCOS and normal baseline glycemic homeostasis resulted in reduction and stabilization of BM, improvements of MF and androgen profile and low conversion rate to diabetes.

Open access

Xiaoli Liu, Lanxiang Liu, Rui Wang, Xiaojiao Jia, Binbin Liu, Ning Ma, and Qiang Lu

Background

We aimed to investigate early arteriosclerosis and its risk factors in populations with prediabetes and new-onset diabetes.

Materials and methods

A total of 148 participants who did not have diabetes mellitus were assigned to three groups through an oral glucose tolerance test: the normal glucose tolerance (NGT) group; the impaired glucose regulation, also known as prediabetes group and the new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus group. The insulin resistance index was assessed using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). An ELISA was used to determine the level of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). An arteriosclerosis detector was used to measure the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and ankle-brachial index (ABI). The baPWV, ABI, and FGF21 were used to assess early arteriosclerosis.

Results

Significant differences in age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose (2hPG), 2-h insulin (2hINS), and HOMA-IR were found between the NGT group and the prediabetes and new-onset diabetes groups. All of the above, except 2hINS, showed an increasing trend. Moreover, the FGF21 was higher in the new-onset diabetes group than in the NGT group. The baPWV was higher in the new-onset diabetes group than in the other two groups, but no significant difference was noted in the ABI. Age, SBP, diastolic blood pressure, FPG, 2hPG, and FGF21 were positively correlated with the baPWV. In addition, FPG, SBP, FGF21, and HOMA-IR were independent risk factors for the baPWV.

Conclusions

Patients with prediabetes and new-onset diabetes may have more significant early arteriosclerosis. The blood glucose level and insulin resistance index may be independent risk factors for early arteriosclerosis.

Open access

Lilit Egshatyan, Daria Kashtanova, Anna Popenko, Olga Tkacheva, Alexander Tyakht, Dmitry Alexeev, Natalia Karamnova, Elena Kostryukova, Vladislav Babenko, Maria Vakhitova, and Sergey Boytsov

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a serious disease. The gut microbiota (GM) has recently been identified as a new potential risk factor in addition to well-known diabetes risk factors. To investigate the GM composition in association with the dietary patterns in patients with different glucose tolerance, we analyzed 92 patients: with normal glucose tolerance (n=48), prediabetes (preD, n=24), and T2D (n=20). Metagenomic analysis was performed using 16S rRNA sequencing. The diet has been studied by a frequency method with a quantitative evaluation of food intake using a computer program. Microbiota in the samples was predominantly represented by Firmicutes, in a less degree by Bacteroidetes. Blautia was a dominant genus in all samples. The representation of Blautia, Serratia was lower in preD than in T2D patients, and even lower in those with normal glucose tolerance. After the clustering of the samples into groups according to the percentage of protein, fat, carbohydrates in the diet, the representation of the Bacteroides turned to be lower and Prevotella abundance turned to be higher in carbohydrate cluster. There were more patients with insulin resistance, T2D in the fat–protein cluster. Using the Calinski–Harabasz index identified the samples with more similar diets. It was discovered that half of the patients with a high-fat diet had normal tolerance, the others had T2D. The regression analysis showed that these T2D patients also had a higher representation of Blautia. Our study provides the further evidence concerning the structural modulation of the GM in the T2DM pathogenesis depending on the dietary patterns.

Open access

Taís S Assmann, Mariana Recamonde-Mendoza, Bianca M De Souza, and Daisy Crispim

Growing evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) have a key role in processes involved in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) pathogenesis, including immune system functions and beta-cell metabolism and death. Although dysregulated miRNA profiles have been identified in T1DM patients, results are inconclusive; with only few miRNAs being consistently dysregulated among studies. Thus, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the subject, followed by bioinformatic analysis, to point out which miRNAs are dysregulated in T1DM-related tissues and in which pathways they act. PubMed and EMBASE were searched to identify all studies that compared miRNA expressions between T1DM patients and non-diabetic controls. Search was completed in August, 2017. Those miRNAs consistently dysregulated in T1DM-related tissues were submitted to bioinformatic analysis, using six databases of miRNA–target gene interactions to retrieve their putative targets and identify potentially affected pathways under their regulation. Thirty-three studies were included in the systematic review: 19 of them reported miRNA expressions in human samples, 13 in murine models and one in both human and murine samples. Among 278 dysregulated miRNAs reported in these studies, 25.9% were reported in at least 2 studies; however, only 48 of them were analyzed in tissues directly related to T1DM pathogenesis (serum/plasma, pancreas and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)). Regarding circulating miRNAs, 11 were consistently dysregulated in T1DM patients compared to controls: miR-21-5p, miR-24-3p, miR-100-5p, miR-146a-5p, miR-148a-3p, miR-150-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-210-5p, miR-342-3p, miR-375 and miR-1275. The bioinformatic analysis retrieved a total of 5867 validated and 2979 predicted miRNA–target interactions for human miRNAs. In functional enrichment analysis of miRNA target genes, 77 KEGG terms were enriched for more than one miRNA. These miRNAs are involved in pathways related to immune system function, cell survival, cell proliferation and insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In conclusion, eleven circulating miRNAs seem to be dysregulated in T1DM patients in different studies, being potential circulating biomarkers of this disease.

Open access

T Grimmichova, M Haluzik, K Vondra, P Matucha, and M Hill

Objective

Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) generally experience a higher incidence of cancer. However, the association between T2DM and thyroid cancer is inconclusive.

Methods

Case-control prospective study, where 722 patients were screened for T2DM and prediabetes (PDM) and underwent thyroid ultrasound and biochemical tests. The patients were assigned to groups of PDM (n = 55), T2DM (n = 79) or a non-diabetes group (NDM) (n = 588). Fine-needle aspiration biopsy was carried out in 263 patients. Histological examinations were done for 109 patients after surgery, with findings of 52 benign (BS) and 57 malignant tumors (MS).

Results

Thirty-three percent of patients with T2DM and especially PDM were newly diagnosed by our screening: 6.5% with T2DM and 72% with PDM, respectively. The percentage of thyroid cancers did not significantly differ between the groups (χ2 test = 0.461; P = 0.794). Relevant positive thyroid predictors for T2DM (t-statistic = 25.87; P < 0.01) and PDM (21.69; P < 0.01) contrary to NDM (−26.9; P < 0.01) were thyroid volume (4.79; P < 0.01), thyroid nodule volume (3.25; P < 0.01) and multinodular thyroid gland (4.83; P < 0.01), while negative relevant predictors included the occurrence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) (−2.01; P < 0.05).

Conclusion

In general, we did not observe an increased risk for thyroid cancer in the diabetic and prediabetic groups in comparison to controls, in spite of well-established increased risk for other malignancies. Structural and benign changes such as larger and multinodular thyroid glands, in comparison to autoimmune thyroid disease, are present more often in diabetics.

Open access

Stavroula A Paschou, Nektaria Papadopoulou-Marketou, George P Chrousos, and Christina Kanaka-Gantenbein

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from the autoimmune destruction of β cells of the endocrine pancreas. Pathogenesis of T1DM is different from that of type 2 diabetes mellitus, where both insulin resistance and reduced secretion of insulin by the β cells play a synergistic role. We will present genetic, environmental and immunologic factors that destroy β cells of the endocrine pancreas and lead to insulin deficiency. The process of autoimmune destruction takes place in genetically susceptible individuals under the triggering effect of one or more environmental factors and usually progresses over a period of many months to years, during which period patients are asymptomatic and euglycemic, but positive for relevant autoantibodies. Symptomatic hyperglycemia and frank diabetes occur after a long latency period, which reflects the large percentage of β cells that need to be destroyed before overt diabetes become evident.

Open access

R Solomon-Zemler, L Basel-Vanagaite, D Steier, S Yakar, E Mel, M Phillip, L Bazak, D Bercovich, H Werner, and L de Vries

Mutation in the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) gene is a rare cause for intrauterine and postnatal growth disorders. Patients identified with IGF1R mutations present with either normal or impaired glucose tolerance. None of the cases described so far showed hypoglycemia. We aimed to identify the genetic basis for small for gestational age, short stature and hypoglycemia over three generations in one family. The proband, a 9-year-old male, presented in infancy with recurrent hypoglycemic episodes, symmetric intrauterine growth retardation and postnatal growth retardation. Blood DNA samples from the patient, his parents, a maternal sister and maternal grandmother underwent Sanger sequencing of the IGF1R gene. Primary skin fibroblast cultures of the patient, his mother and age- and sex-matched control donors were used for gene expression and receptor functional analyses. We found a novel heterozygous mutation (c.94 + 1g > a, D1105E) affecting the splicing site of the IGF1R mRNA in the patient, his mother and his grandmother. Primary fibroblast cultures derived from the patient and his mother showed reduced proliferation and impaired activation of the IGF1R, evident by reduced IGF1R and AKT phosphorylation upon ligand binding. In conclusion, the newly identified heterozygous missense mutation in exon 1 of IGF1R (D1105E) results in impaired IGF1R function and is associated with small for gestational age, microcephaly and abnormal glucose metabolism. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms by which this mutation leads to hypoglycemia.