Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 458 items for

  • Abstract: adiponectin x
  • Abstract: Beta x
  • Abstract: diabetes x
  • Abstract: diabetic x
  • Abstract: Glucagon x
  • Abstract: glucose x
  • Abstract: Hyperglycemia x
  • Abstract: Hypoglycemia x
  • Abstract: Insulin x
  • Abstract: Langerhans x
  • Abstract: Islets x
  • Abstract: Pancreas x
  • Abstract: prediabetes x
  • Abstract: metabo* x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

T Grimmichova, M Haluzik, K Vondra, P Matucha, and M Hill

Objective

Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) generally experience a higher incidence of cancer. However, the association between T2DM and thyroid cancer is inconclusive.

Methods

Case-control prospective study, where 722 patients were screened for T2DM and prediabetes (PDM) and underwent thyroid ultrasound and biochemical tests. The patients were assigned to groups of PDM (n = 55), T2DM (n = 79) or a non-diabetes group (NDM) (n = 588). Fine-needle aspiration biopsy was carried out in 263 patients. Histological examinations were done for 109 patients after surgery, with findings of 52 benign (BS) and 57 malignant tumors (MS).

Results

Thirty-three percent of patients with T2DM and especially PDM were newly diagnosed by our screening: 6.5% with T2DM and 72% with PDM, respectively. The percentage of thyroid cancers did not significantly differ between the groups (χ2 test = 0.461; P = 0.794). Relevant positive thyroid predictors for T2DM (t-statistic = 25.87; P < 0.01) and PDM (21.69; P < 0.01) contrary to NDM (−26.9; P < 0.01) were thyroid volume (4.79; P < 0.01), thyroid nodule volume (3.25; P < 0.01) and multinodular thyroid gland (4.83; P < 0.01), while negative relevant predictors included the occurrence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) (−2.01; P < 0.05).

Conclusion

In general, we did not observe an increased risk for thyroid cancer in the diabetic and prediabetic groups in comparison to controls, in spite of well-established increased risk for other malignancies. Structural and benign changes such as larger and multinodular thyroid glands, in comparison to autoimmune thyroid disease, are present more often in diabetics.

Open access

Taís S Assmann, Mariana Recamonde-Mendoza, Bianca M De Souza, and Daisy Crispim

Growing evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) have a key role in processes involved in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) pathogenesis, including immune system functions and beta-cell metabolism and death. Although dysregulated miRNA profiles have been identified in T1DM patients, results are inconclusive; with only few miRNAs being consistently dysregulated among studies. Thus, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the subject, followed by bioinformatic analysis, to point out which miRNAs are dysregulated in T1DM-related tissues and in which pathways they act. PubMed and EMBASE were searched to identify all studies that compared miRNA expressions between T1DM patients and non-diabetic controls. Search was completed in August, 2017. Those miRNAs consistently dysregulated in T1DM-related tissues were submitted to bioinformatic analysis, using six databases of miRNA–target gene interactions to retrieve their putative targets and identify potentially affected pathways under their regulation. Thirty-three studies were included in the systematic review: 19 of them reported miRNA expressions in human samples, 13 in murine models and one in both human and murine samples. Among 278 dysregulated miRNAs reported in these studies, 25.9% were reported in at least 2 studies; however, only 48 of them were analyzed in tissues directly related to T1DM pathogenesis (serum/plasma, pancreas and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)). Regarding circulating miRNAs, 11 were consistently dysregulated in T1DM patients compared to controls: miR-21-5p, miR-24-3p, miR-100-5p, miR-146a-5p, miR-148a-3p, miR-150-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-210-5p, miR-342-3p, miR-375 and miR-1275. The bioinformatic analysis retrieved a total of 5867 validated and 2979 predicted miRNA–target interactions for human miRNAs. In functional enrichment analysis of miRNA target genes, 77 KEGG terms were enriched for more than one miRNA. These miRNAs are involved in pathways related to immune system function, cell survival, cell proliferation and insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In conclusion, eleven circulating miRNAs seem to be dysregulated in T1DM patients in different studies, being potential circulating biomarkers of this disease.

Open access

Tingting Shu, Zhigang Lv, Yuchun Xie, Junming Tang, and Xuhua Mao

It has been well established that glucotoxicity induces pancreatic β-cells dysfunction; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Our previous studies demonstrated that high glucose concentrations are associated with decreased hepcidin expression, which inhibits insulin synthesis. In this study, we focused on the role of low hepcidin level-induced increased iron deposition in β-cells and the relationship between abnormal iron metabolism and β-cell dysfunction. Decreased hepcidin expression increased iron absorption by upregulating transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) expression, resulting in iron accumulation within cells. Prussia blue stain and calcein-AM assays revealed greater iron accumulation in the cytoplasm of pancreatic tissue isolated from db/db mice, cultured islets and Min6 cells in response to high glucose stimulation. Increased cytosolic iron deposition was associated with greater Fe2+ influx into the mitochondria, which depolarized the mitochondria membrane potential, inhibited ATP synthesis, generated excessive ROS and induced oxidative stress. The toxic effect of excessive iron on mitochondrial function eventually resulted in impaired insulin secretion. The restricted iron content in db/db mice via reduced iron intake or accelerated iron clearance improved blood glucose levels with decreased fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting blood insulin (FIns), HbA1c level, as well as improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) results. Thus, our study may reveal the mechanism involved in the role of hepcidin in the glucotoxcity impaired pancreatic β cell function pathway.

Open access

Stavroula A Paschou, Nektaria Papadopoulou-Marketou, George P Chrousos, and Christina Kanaka-Gantenbein

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from the autoimmune destruction of β cells of the endocrine pancreas. Pathogenesis of T1DM is different from that of type 2 diabetes mellitus, where both insulin resistance and reduced secretion of insulin by the β cells play a synergistic role. We will present genetic, environmental and immunologic factors that destroy β cells of the endocrine pancreas and lead to insulin deficiency. The process of autoimmune destruction takes place in genetically susceptible individuals under the triggering effect of one or more environmental factors and usually progresses over a period of many months to years, during which period patients are asymptomatic and euglycemic, but positive for relevant autoantibodies. Symptomatic hyperglycemia and frank diabetes occur after a long latency period, which reflects the large percentage of β cells that need to be destroyed before overt diabetes become evident.

Open access

Espen Nordheim, Jørn Petter Lindahl, Rasmus Kirkeskov Carlsen, Anders Åsberg, Kåre Inge Birkeland, Rune Horneland, Birgitte Boye, Hanne Scholz, and Trond Geir Jenssen

Objective

β-cell replacement therapy (βCRT), including pancreas transplantation alone (PTA) and islet transplantation (ITX), is a treatment option for selected type 1 diabetes patients. All potential candidates for βCRT in Norway are referred to one national transplant centre for evaluation before any pre-transplant workup is started. This evaluation was performed by a transplant nephrologist alone prior to 2015 and by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) from 2015. We have reviewed the allocation of patients to treatment modality and the 1-year clinical outcome for the patients after transplantation.

Research design and methods

Medical charts of all patients evaluated for βCRT between 2010 and 2020 in Norway were retrospectively analysed and the outcome of patients receiving βCRT were studied.

Results

One hundred and forty-four patients were assessed for βCRT eligibility between 2010 and 2020. After MDT evaluation was introduced for βCRT eligibility in 2015, the percentage of referred patients accepted for the transplant waiting list fell from 84% to 40% (P < 0.005). One year after transplantation, 73% of the PTA and none of the ITX patients were independent of exogenous insulin, 8% of the PTA and 90% of the ITX patients had partial graft function while 19% of the PTA and 10% of the ITX patients suffered from graft loss.

Conclusion

The acceptance rate for βCRT was significantly reduced during a 10-year observation period and 81% of the PTA and 90% of the ITX patients had partial or normal graft function 1 year post-transplant.

Open access

Sara Ullsten, Sara Bohman, Marie E Oskarsson, K Peter R Nilsson, Gunilla T Westermark, and Per-Ola Carlsson

Islet amyloid and beta cell death in type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous events, where some islets are affected early in the disease process, whereas others remain visibly unaffected. This study investigated the possibility that inter-islet functional and vascular differences may explain the propensity for amyloid accumulation in certain islets. Highly blood-perfused islets were identified by microspheres in human islet amyloid polypeptide expressing mice fed a high-fat diet for three or 10 months. These highly blood-perfused islets had better glucose-stimulated insulin secretion capacity than other islets and developed more amyloid deposits after 10 months of high-fat diet. Similarly, human islets with a superior release capacity formed more amyloid in high glucose culture than islets with a lower release capacity. The amyloid formation in mouse islets was associated with a higher amount of prohormone convertase 1/3 and with a decreased expression of its inhibitor proSAAS when compared to islets with less amyloid. In contrast, levels of prohormone convertase 2 and expression of its inhibitor neuroendocrine protein 7B2 were unaltered. A misbalance in prohormone convertase levels may interrupt the normal processing of islet amyloid polypeptide and induce amyloid formation. Preferential amyloid load in the most blood-perfused and functional islets may accelerate the progression of type 2 diabetes.

Open access

Darling M Rojas-Canales, Michaela Waibel, Aurelien Forget, Daniella Penko, Jodie Nitschke, Fran J Harding, Bahman Delalat, Anton Blencowe, Thomas Loudovaris, Shane T Grey, Helen E Thomas, Thomas W H Kay, Chris J Drogemuller, Nicolas H Voelcker, and Patrick T Coates

Islet transplantation is currently the only minimally invasive therapy available for patients with type 1 diabetes that can lead to insulin independence; however, it is limited to only a small number of patients. Although clinical procedures have improved in the isolation and culture of islets, a large number of islets are still lost in the pre-transplant period, limiting the success of this treatment. Moreover, current practice includes islets being prepared at specialized centers, which are sometimes remote to the transplant location. Thus, a critical point of intervention to maintain the quality and quantity of isolated islets is during transportation between isolation centers and the transplanting hospitals, during which 20–40% of functional islets can be lost. The current study investigated the use of an oxygen-permeable PDMS microwell device for long-distance transportation of isolated islets. We demonstrate that the microwell device protected islets from aggregation during transport, maintaining viability and average islet size during shipping.

Open access

R Solomon-Zemler, L Basel-Vanagaite, D Steier, S Yakar, E Mel, M Phillip, L Bazak, D Bercovich, H Werner, and L de Vries

Mutation in the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) gene is a rare cause for intrauterine and postnatal growth disorders. Patients identified with IGF1R mutations present with either normal or impaired glucose tolerance. None of the cases described so far showed hypoglycemia. We aimed to identify the genetic basis for small for gestational age, short stature and hypoglycemia over three generations in one family. The proband, a 9-year-old male, presented in infancy with recurrent hypoglycemic episodes, symmetric intrauterine growth retardation and postnatal growth retardation. Blood DNA samples from the patient, his parents, a maternal sister and maternal grandmother underwent Sanger sequencing of the IGF1R gene. Primary skin fibroblast cultures of the patient, his mother and age- and sex-matched control donors were used for gene expression and receptor functional analyses. We found a novel heterozygous mutation (c.94 + 1g > a, D1105E) affecting the splicing site of the IGF1R mRNA in the patient, his mother and his grandmother. Primary fibroblast cultures derived from the patient and his mother showed reduced proliferation and impaired activation of the IGF1R, evident by reduced IGF1R and AKT phosphorylation upon ligand binding. In conclusion, the newly identified heterozygous missense mutation in exon 1 of IGF1R (D1105E) results in impaired IGF1R function and is associated with small for gestational age, microcephaly and abnormal glucose metabolism. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms by which this mutation leads to hypoglycemia.

Open access

Jakob Høgild Langdahl, Anja Lisbeth Frederiksen, John Vissing, Morten Frost, Knud Bonnet Yderstræde, and Per Heden Andersen

Aim

This case–control study aimed to examine impairments in glucose metabolism in non-diabetic carriers of the mitochondrial mutation m.3243A>G by evaluating insulin secretion capacity and sensitivity.

Methods

Glucose metabolism was investigated in 23 non-diabetic m.3243A>G carriers and age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy controls with an extended 4-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Insulin sensitivity index and acute insulin response were estimated on the basis of the OGTT. This was accompanied by examination of body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), maximum aerobic capacity and a Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire (RPAQ).

Results

Fasting p-glucose, s-insulin and s-c-peptide levels did not differ between m.3243A>G carriers and controls. Insulin sensitivity index (BIGTT-S1) was significantly lower in the m.3243A>G carriers, but there was no difference in the acute insulin response between groups. P-lactate levels were higher in carriers throughout the OGTT. VO2max, but not BMI, waist and hip circumferences, lean and fat body mass%, MET or grip strength, was lower in mutation carriers. BIGTT-S1 remained lower in mutation carriers after adjustment for multiple confounding factors including VO2max in regression analyses.

Conclusions

Glucose metabolism in m.3243A>G carriers was characterized by reduced insulin sensitivity, which could represent the earliest phase in the pathogenesis of m.3243A>G-associated diabetes.

Open access

Tao Yuan, Lanping Jiang, Chen Chen, Xiaoyan Peng, Min Nie, Xuemei Li, Xiaoping Xing, Xuewang Li, and Limeng Chen

Objective

Impaired glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity have been reported in patients with Gitelman syndrome (GS), but insulin secretion and the related mechanisms are not well understood.

Design and methods

The serum glucose levels, insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were evaluated in patients with GS (n = 28), patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and healthy individuals (n = 20 in both groups) using an oral glucose tolerance test. Serum and urine sodium, potassium and creatinine levels were measured at 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min after an oral glucose load was administered.

Results

The areas under the serum glucose curves were higher in the GS patients than those in the healthy controls (17.4 ± 5.1 mmol·h/L vs 14.5 ± 2.8 mmol·h/L, P = 0.02) but lower than those in the DM patients (24.8 ± 5.3 mmol·h/L, P < 0.001). The areas under the serum insulin curves and the insulin secretion indexes in GS patients were higher than those in DM patients and lower than those in healthy subjects. The insulin secretion-sensitivity index of GS patients was between that of healthy subjects and DM patients, but the insulin sensitivity indices were not different among the three groups. After one hour of glucose administration, the serum potassium level significantly decreased from baseline, and the urinary potassium-to-creatinine ratio increased gradually and peaked at 2 h.

Conclusions

Glucose metabolism and insulin secretion were impaired in GS patients, but insulin sensitivity was comparable between GS patients and patients with type 2 DM. After administration of an oral glucose load, the plasma potassium level decreased in GS patients due to the increased excretion of potassium in the urine.