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Open access

Charlotte Höybye, Beverly M K Biller, Jean-Marc Ferran, Murray B Gordon, Nicky Kelepouris, Navid Nedjatian, Anne H Olsen, and Matthias M Weber

Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Long-term growth hormone (GH) treatment could improve CV outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate CV disease risk in patients with AGHD who received GH replacement therapy for up to 10 years as part of NordiNet® IOS (NCT00960128) and the ANSWER Program (NCT01009905). The studies were observational, non-interventional and multicentre, monitoring long-term effectiveness and safety of GH treatment. NordiNet® IOS involved 23 countries (469 sites) across Europe and the Middle East. The ANSWER Program was conducted in the USA (207 sites). This analysis included patients aged 18–75 years who were GH naïve at study entry, who had ≤10 years of GH treatment data and who could be assessed for CV risk for at least 1 follow-up year. The main outcome measure was risk of CV disease by age 75 years, as calculated with the Multinational Cardiovascular Risk Consortium model (Brunner score) using non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol adjusted for age, sex and CV risk factors. The results of this analysis showed that CV risk decreased gradually over the 10-year period for GH-treated patients. The risk was lower for patients treated for 2 and 7 years vs age- and sex-matched control groups (not yet started treatment) (14.51% vs 16.15%; P = 0.0105 and 13.53% vs 16.81%; P = 0.0001, respectively). This suggests that GH treatment in people with AGHD may reduce the risk of CV disease by age 75 years compared with matched controls.

Open access

Chenmin Wei, Zichen Zhang, Qi Fu, Yunqiang He, Tao Yang, and Min Sun

Objective

Lipotoxicity-induced pancreatic β cell-dysfunction results in decreased insulin secretion in response to multiple stimulus. In this study, we investigated the reversible effects of palmitate (PA) or oleate (OA) on insulin secretion and the relationship with pancreatic β-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels.

Methods

MIN6 cells were treated with PA and OA for 48 h and then washed out for 24 h to determine the changes in expression and endocytosis of the KATP channels and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and sulfonylurea-stimulated insulin secretion (SU-SIS).

Results

MIN6 cells exposed to PA or OA showed both impaired GSIS and SU-SIS; the former was not restorable, while the latter was reversible with washout of PA or OA. Decreased expressions of both total and surface Kir6.2 and SUR1 and endocytosis of KATP channels were observed, which were also recoverable after washout. When MIN6 cells exposed to free fatty acids (FFAs) were cotreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) or dynasore, we found that endocytosis of KATP channels did not change significantly by AICAR but was almost completely blocked by dynasore. Meanwhile, the inhibition of endocytosis of KATP channels after washout could be activated by PIP2. The recovery of SU-SIS after washout was significantly weakened by PIP2, but the decrease of SU-SIS induced by FFAs was not alleviated by dynasore.

Conclusions

FFAs can cause reversible impairment of SU-SIS on pancreatic β cells. The reversibility of the effects is partial because of the changes of expression and endocytosis of Kir6.2 and SUR1 which was mediated by dynamin.

Open access

Amir H Zamanipoor Najafabadi, Merel van der Meulen, Ana Luisa Priego Zurita, S Faisal Ahmed, Wouter R van Furth, Evangelia Charmandari, Olaf Hiort, Alberto M Pereira, Mehul Dattani, Diana Vitali, Johan P de Graaf, and Nienke R Biermasz

Objective

The European Reference Network on Rare Endocrine Conditions (Endo-ERN) aims to organize high-quality healthcare throughout Europe, including care for pituitary adenoma patients. As surgery is the mainstay of treatment, we aimed to describe the current surgical practice and published surgical outcomes of pituitary adenoma within Endo-ERN.

Design and Methods

Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting surgical outcomes of pituitary adenoma patients within Endo-ERN MTG6 pituitary reference centers between 2010 and 2019. A survey was completed by reference centers on their current surgical practice.

Results

A total of 18 out of 43 (42%) reference centers located in 7 of the 20 (35%) MTG6-represented countries published 48 articles. Remission rates were 50% (95% CI: 42–59) for patients with acromegaly, 68% (95% CI: 60–75) for Cushing’s disease, and 53% (95% CI: 39–66%) for prolactinoma. Gross total resection was achieved in 49% (95% CI: 37–61%) of patients and visual improvement in 78% (95% CI: 68–87). Mortality, hemorrhage, and carotid injury occurred in less than 1% of patients. New-onset hypopituitarism occurred in 16% (95% CI: 11–23), transient diabetes insipidus in 12% (95% CI: 6–21), permanent diabetes insipidus in 4% (95% CI: 3–6), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) in 9% (95% CI: 5–14), severe epistaxis in 2% (95% CI: 0–4), and cerebrospinal fluid leak in 4% (95% CI: 2–6). Thirty-five (81%) centers completed the survey: 54% were operated endoscopically and 57% were together with an ENT surgeon.

Conclusion

The results of this study could be used as a first benchmark for the outcomes of pituitary adenoma surgery within Endo-ERN. However, the heterogeneity between studies in the reporting of outcomes hampers comparability and warrants outcome collection through registries.

Open access

Christine Poitou, Anthony Holland, Charlotte Höybye, Laura C G de Graaff, Sandrine Bottius, Berit Otterlei, and Maithé Tauber

Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS), the most common form of syndromic obesity, is a complex neurodevelopmental genetic disorder including obesity with hyperphagia, endocrine and metabolic disorders and also psychiatric disorders. The most frequent endocrine disturbances include hypogonadism and growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Hypothyroidism and central adrenal insufficiency can also be observed but are less frequent. The transition of individuals with PWS from adolescence to adult life is challenging because of multiple comorbidities and complex disabilities. Individuals and caregivers face psychological, medical and social issues. This period of profound changes is thus prone to disruptions, and the main risks being the worsening of the medical situation and loss to follow-up of the individuals. Medical care may be poorly adapted to the needs of individuals because of a lack of knowledge concerning the syndrome and also lack of the necessary specific skills. A multidisciplinary panel composed of several experts in PWS met in November 2021 during an European Reference Network on Rare Endocrine Conditions (Endo-ERN) webinar. They presented complementary aspects of PWS from the perspective of the transition including psychiatric, pediatric and adult endocrinological and parent’s and patient’s points of view and shed light on the best way to approach this pivotal period.

Open access

Hoda Gad, Einas Elgassim, Ibrahim Mohammed, Ahmad Yaser Alhaddad, Hussein Ahmed Hussein Zaky Aly, John-John Cabibihan, Abdulaziz Al-Ali, Kishor Kumar Sadasivuni, Aliyaa Haji, Neila Lamine, Adnan Khan, Ioannis N Petropoulos, Georgios Ponirakis, Alise Kalteniece, Maryam Ferdousi, Shazli Azmi, Uazman Alam, Wajeeha Abuhelaiqa, Amin Jayyousi, Dabia AlMohanadi, Khaled Baagar, and Rayaz A Malik

Objective

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has revealed that glycemic variability and low time in range are associated with albuminuria and retinopathy. We have investigated the relationship between glucose metrics derived from CGM and a highly sensitive measure of neuropathy using corneal confocal microscopy in participants with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Methods

A total of 40 participants with diabetes and 28 healthy controls underwent quantification of corneal nerve fiber density (CNFD), corneal nerve branch density (CNBD), corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) and inferior whorl length (IWL) and those with diabetes underwent CGM for four consecutive days.

Results

CNBD was significantly lower in patients with high glycemic variability (GV) compared to low GV (median (range) (25.0 (19.0–37.5) vs 38.6 (29.2–46.9); P = 0.007); in patients who spent >4% compared to <4% time in level 1 hypoglycemia (54-69 mg/dL) (25.0 (22.9–37.5) vs 37.5 (29.2–46.9); P = 0.045) and in patients who spent >1% compared to <1% time in level 2 hypoglycemia (<54 mg/dL) (25.0 (19.8–41.7) vs 35.4 (28.1–44.8); P = 0.04). Duration in level 1 hypoglycemia correlated with CNBD (r = –0.342, P = 0.031). Duration in level 1 (181–250 mg/dL) and level 2 (>250 mg/dL) hyperglycemia did not correlate with CNFD (P > 0.05), CNBD (P > 0.05), CNFL (P > 0.05) or IWL (P > 0.05).

Conclusions

Greater GV and duration in hypoglycemia, rather than hyperglycemia, are associated with nerve fiber loss in diabetes.

Open access

Nathalia Liberatoscioli Menezes Andrade, Mariana Ferreira de Assis Funari, Alexsandra Christianne Malaquias, Paulo Ferrez Collett-Solberg, Nathalia L R A Gomes, Renata Scalco, Naiara Castelo Branco Dantas, Raissa C Rezende, Angelica M F P Tiburcio, Micheline A R Souza, Bruna L Freire, Ana C V Krepischi, Carlos Alberto Longui, Antonio Marcondes Lerario, Ivo J P Arnhold, Alexander A L Jorge, and Gabriela Andrade Vasques

Objective

Most children with short stature remain without an etiologic diagnosis after extensive clinical and laboratory evaluation and are classified as idiopathic short stature (ISS). This study aimed to determine the diagnostic yield of a multigene analysis in children classified as ISS.

Design and methods

We selected 102 children with ISS and performed the genetic analysis as part of the initial investigation. We developed customized targeted panel sequencing, including all genes already implicated in the isolated short-stature phenotype. Rare and deleterious single nucleotide or copy number variants were assessed by bioinformatic tools.

Results

We identified 20 heterozygous pathogenic (P) or likely pathogenic (LP) genetic variants in 17 of 102 patients (diagnostic yield = 16.7%). Three patients had more than one P/LP genetic alteration. Most of the findings were in genes associated with the growth plate differentiation: IHH (n  = 4), SHOX (n  = 3), FGFR3 (n  = 2), NPR2 (n  = 2), ACAN (n  = 2), and COL2A1 (n  = 1) or involved in the RAS/MAPK pathway: NF1 (n  = 2), PTPN11 (n  = 1), CBL (n  = 1), and BRAF (n  = 1). None of these patients had clinical findings to guide a candidate gene approach. The diagnostic yield was higher among children with severe short stature (35% vs 12.2% for height SDS ≤ or > −3; P = 0.034). The genetic diagnosis had an impact on clinical management for four children.

Conclusion

A multigene sequencing approach can determine the genetic etiology of short stature in up to one in six children with ISS, removing the term idiopathic from their clinical classification.

Open access

Alexander Heinzel, Dirk Müller, Hanneke M van Santen, Sarah C Clement, Arthur B Schneider, and Frederik A Verburg

Background

Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) who received radiation therapy exposing the thyroid gland are at increased risk of developing differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Therefore, the International Guideline Harmonization Group (IGHG) on late effects of childhood cancer therefore recommends surveillance. It is unclear whether surveillance reduces mortality.

Aim

The aim of this study was to compare four strategies for DTC surveillance in CCS with the aim of reducing mortality: Strategy-1, no surveillance; Strategy-2, ultrasound alone; Strategy-3, ultrasound followed by fine-needle biopsy (FNB); Strategy-4, palpation followed by ultrasound and FNB.

Materials and methods

A decision tree was formulated with 10-year thyroid cancer-specific survival as the endpoint, based on data extracted from literature.

Results

It was calculated that 12.6% of CCS will develop DTC. Using Strategy-1, all CCS with DTC would erroneously not be operated upon, but no CCS would have unnecessary surgery. With Strategy-2, all CCS with and 55.6% of CCS without DTC would be operated. Using Strategy-3, 11.1% of CCS with DTC would be correctly operated upon, 11.2% without DTC would be operated upon and 1.5% with DTC would not be operated upon. With Strategy-4, these percentages would be 6.8, 3.9 and 5.8%, respectively. Median 10-year survival rates would be equal across strategies (0.997).

Conclusion

Different surveillance strategies for DTC in CCS all result in the same high DTC survival. Therefore, the indication for surveillance may lie in a reduction of surgery-related morbidity rather than DTC-related mortality. In accordance with the IGHG guidelines, the precise strategy should be decided upon in a process of shared decision-making.

Open access

Luca Persani, Martine Cools, Stamatina Ioakim, S Faisal Ahmed, Silvia Andonova, Magdalena Avbelj-Stefanija, Federico Baronio, Jerome Bouligand, Hennie T Bruggenwirth, Justin H Davies, Elfride De Baere, Iveta Dzivite-Krisane, Paula Fernandez-Alvarez, Alexander Gheldof, Claudia Giavoli, Claus H Gravholt, Olaf Hiort, Paul-Martin Holterhus, Anders Juul, Csilla Krausz, Kristina Lagerstedt-Robinson, Ruth McGowan, Uta Neumann, Antonio Novelli, Xavier Peyrassol, Leonidas A Phylactou, Julia Rohayem, Philippe Touraine, Dineke Westra, Valeria Vezzoli, and Raffaella Rossetti

Differences of sex development and maturation (SDM) represent a heterogeneous puzzle of rare conditions with a large genetic component whose management and treatment could be improved by an accurate classification of underlying molecular conditions, and next-generation sequencing (NGS) should represent the most appropriate approach. Therefore, we conducted a survey dedicated to the use and potential outcomes of NGS for SDM disorders diagnosis among the 53 health care providers (HCP) of the European Reference Network for rare endocrine conditions. The response rate was 49% with a total of 26 HCPs from 13 countries. All HCPs, except 1, performed NGS investigations for SDM disorders on 6720 patients, 3764 (56%) with differences of sex development (DSD), including 811 unexplained primary ovarian insufficiency, and 2956 (44%) with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). The approaches varied from targeted analysis of custom gene panels (range: 11–490 genes) in 81.5% of cases or whole exome sequencing with the extraction of a virtual panel in the remaining cases. These analyses were performed for diagnostic purposes in 21 HCPs, supported by the National Health Systems in 16 cases. The likelihood of finding a variant ranged between 7 and 60%, mainly depending upon the number of analysed genes or criteria used for reporting, most HCPs also reporting variants of uncertain significance. These data illustrate the status of genetic diagnosis of DSD and CHH across Europe. In most countries, these analyses are performed for diagnostic purposes, yielding highly variable results, thus suggesting the need for harmonization and general improvements of NGS approaches.

Open access

Rachel Forfar, Mashal Hussain, Puneet Khurana, Jennifer Cook, Steve Lewis, Dillon Popat, David Jackson, Ed McIver, Jeff Jerman, Debra Taylor, Adrian JL Clark, and Li F Chan

The overproduction of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), in conditions such as Cushing’s disease and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), leads to significant morbidity. Current treatment with glucocorticoids does not adequately suppress plasma ACTH, resulting in excess adrenal androgen production. At present, there is no effective medical treatment in clinical use that would directly block the action of ACTH. Such a therapy would be of great clinical value. ACTH acts via a highly selective receptor, the melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R) associated with its accessory protein MRAP. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and the high degree of ligand specificity suggest that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic strategy in the treatment of conditions of ACTH excess. To this end, we screened an extensive library of low-molecular-weight drug-like compounds for MC2R antagonist activity using a high-throughput homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence cAMP assay in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably co-expressing human MC2R and MRAP. Hits that demonstrated MC2R antagonist properties were counter-screened against the β2 adrenergic receptor and dose–response analysis undertaken. This led to the identification of a highly specific MC2R antagonist capable of antagonising ACTH-induced progesterone release in murine Y-1 adrenal cells and having selectivity for MC2R amongst the human melanocortin receptors. This work provides a foundation for the clinical investigation of small-molecule ACTH antagonists as therapeutic agents and proof of concept for the screening and discovery of such compounds.

Open access

Peter Wolf, Alexandre Dormoy, Luigi Maione, Sylvie Salenave, Jacques Young, Peter Kamenický, and Philippe Chanson

Objective

Pasireotide is a second-generation somatostatin receptor ligand (SRL) used for treating acromegaly. Its clinical use is limited by adverse effects on glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate longitudinal changes in beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity associated with pasireotide in patients not controlled by first-generation SRLs.

Design

We performed a retrospective study.

Methods

The efficacy (growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) concentrations; tumor size) and effect on glucose homeostasis were analyzed in 33 patients. Longitudinal data on oral glucose tolerance tests were available before, shortly (mean ± s.d., 6.1 ± 3.8 months) and long term (24.4 ± 11.1 months) after initiation of pasireotide in 14 patients. Insulin secretion (insulinogenic index; disposition index) and insulin sensitivity were calculated by validated indices.

Results

Pasireotide-induced diabetes occurred in 12 patients (36%). It was mediated by impaired insulin secretion, which occurred shortly after initiation of treatment and then remained stable on long term (insulinogenic index, median (min; max), 80 (12; 542) vs 16 (6.4; 101) vs 25 (3.7; 396) pmol/mmol, respectively; P = 0.028; disposition index, 1.45 (0.42; 4.88) vs 0.53 (0.17; 2.63) vs 0.60 (0.22; 1.71), respectively; P = 0.024). No significant changes in insulin sensitivity were observed, despite a marked reduction of GH/IGF-1 concentrations. Older age and a worse glycemic control at baseline were the strongest predictors for hyperglycemia and the need for antidiabetic treatment.

Conclusion

Worsening of glycemic control during pasireotide therapy is caused by an impaired insulin secretion, whereas insulin sensitivity is not affected. These findings might be important for the choice of antidiabetic treatment for pasireotide-induced hyperglycemia.

Significance statement

Pasireotide, a second-generation SRL used for treating acromegaly, may be associated with glucose metabolism impairment. In a retrospective study of 33 patients, we observed that treatment with pasireotide was associated with normalization of serum IGF-1 in almost 60% of patients, but one-third of patients developed diabetes. In the patients who stopped pasireotide because of hyperglycemia, HbA1c promptly decreased. Longitudinal data in 14 patients show that diabetes is mediated by impaired insulin secretion, which occurred shortly and then remained stable on long term, while no significant changes in insulin sensitivity were observed, despite a marked reduction of GH/IGF-1 concentrations. Older age and a worse glycemic control at baseline were the strongest predictors for hyperglycemia.