Browse

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 1,119 items for

  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All
Open access

Marília D'Elboux Guimarães Brescia, Karine Candido Rodrigues, André Fernandes d'Alessandro, Wellington Alves Filho, Willemijn Y. van der Plas, Schelto Kruijff, Sérgio Samir Arap, Sergio Pereira de Almeida Toledo, Fábio Luiz de Menezes Montenegro, and Delmar Muniz Lourenço Junior

Background: Potential influences of the parathyroidectomy (PTx) on quality of life (QoL) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1-related primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT/MEN1) are unknown.

Method: Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire was prospectively applied in 30 HPT/MEN1 patients submitted to PTx (20, subtotal; 10, total with autograft), before, 6 and 12 months (mo.) after surgery. Parameters analyzed included QoL, age, HPT-related symptoms, general pain, comorbidities, biochemical/hormonal response, PTx type and parathyroid volume.

Results: Asymptomatic patients were younger (30 vs 38 years; p=0.04) and presented higher QoL scores (physical component score, PCS, 92.5 vs 61.2 p=0.0051; mental component score, MCS, 82.0 vs 56.0, p=0.04) than symptomatic ones. In both groups, QoL remained stable one year after PTx, independently of number of comorbidities. Preoperative general pain was negatively correlated with PCS (r =-0.60, p=0.0004) and MCS (r=-0.57, p=0.0009). Also, moderate/intense pain was progressively (6/12mo.) more frequent in cases developing hypoparathyroidism. The PTx type and hypoparathyroidism did not affect the QoL at 12mo. although remnant parathyroid tissue volume did have a positive correlation (p=0.0490; r=0.3625) to PCS 12mo. after surgery. Patients with 1-2 comorbidities had as pre-PTx PCS (p=0.0015) as 12mo. post-PTx PCS (p=0.0031) and MCS (p=0.0365) better than patients with 3-4 comorbidities.

Conclusion: A variable QoL profile was underscored in HPT/MEN1 reflecting multiple factors associated to this complex disorder as comorbidities, advanced age at PTx and presence of preoperative symptoms or of general pain perception. Our data encourage the early indication of PTx in HPT/MEN1 by providing known metabolic benefits to target-organs and avoiding potential negative impact on QoL.

Open access

Laurent Maïmoun, Denis Mariano-Goulart, Helena Huguet, Eric Renard, Patrick Lefebvre, Marie-Christine Picot, Anne-Marie Dupuy, Jean-Paul Cristol, Philippe Courtet, Vincent Boudousq, Antoine Avignon, Sébastien Guillaume, and Ariane Sultan

Objectives

The two-fold aim of this study was: (i) to determine the effects of undernutrition on the myokines in patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) and (ii) to examine the potential link between myokines and bone parameters.

Methods

In this study, 42 young women with restrictive AN and 42 age-matched controls (CON) (mean age, 18.5 ± 4.2 years and 18.6 ± 4.2 years, respectively) were enrolled. aBMD and body composition were determined with DXA. Resting energy expenditure (REEm), a marker of energy status, was indirectly assessed by calorimetry. Bone turnover markers and myokines (follistatin, myostatin and irisin) were concomitantly evaluated.

Results

AN patients presented low aBMD at all bone sites. REEm, bone formation markers, myostatin and IGF-1 were significantly lower, whereas the bone resorption marker and follistatin were higher in AN compared with controls. No difference was observed between groups for irisin levels. When the whole population was studied, among myokines, only myostatin was positively correlated with aBMD at all bone sites. However, multiple regression analyses showed that in the AN group, the independent variables for aBMD were principally amenorrhoea duration, lean tissue mass (LTM) and procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP). For CON, the independent variables for aBMD were principally LTM, age and PINP. Whatever the group analysed, none of the myokines appeared as explicative independent variables of aBMD.

Conclusion

This study demonstrated that despite the altered myokine levels in patients with AN, their direct effect on aBMD loss and bone turnover alteration seems limited in comparison with other well-known disease-related factors such as oestrogen deprivation.

Open access

Vânia Benido Silva, Liliana Fonseca, Maria Teresa Pereira, Joana Vilaverde, Clara Pinto, Fernando Pichel, Maria do Céu Almeida, and Jorge Dores

Objective

Metformin has emerged as a safe and effective pharmacological alternative to insulin in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), being associated with lower maternal weight gain and hypoglycemia risk. Nevertheless, glycemic control is unaccomplished in a considerable proportion of women only treated with metformin. We aim to determine the metformin monotherapy failure rate in GDM and to identify predictors of its occurrence.

Design and methods

This was a retrospective multicenter study including pregnant women with GDM patients who started metformin as a first-line pharmacological treatment (n  = 2891). A comparative analysis of clinical and analytical data between the group of women treated with metformin monotherapy and those needing combined therapy with insulin was performed.

Results

In 685 (23.7%) women with GDM, combined therapy to achieve adequate glycemic control was required. Higher pregestational BMI (OR 1.039; CI 95% 1.008–1.071; P-value = 0.013), higher fasting plasma glucose (PG) levels in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (OR 1.047; CI 95% 1.028–1.066; P-value <0.001) and an earlier gestational age (GA) at metformin introduction (0.839; CI 95% 0.796–0.885, P-value < 0.001) were independent predictive factors for metformin monotherapy failure. The best predictive cutoff values were a fasting PG in OGTT ≥87 mg/dL and GA at metformin introduction ≤29 weeks.

Conclusions

In 685 (23.7%) women, combined therapy with insulin to reach glycemic control was required. Higher pre-gestational BMI, fasting PG levels in OGTT ≥87 mg/dL and introduction of metformin ≤29 weeks of GA were independent predictive factors for metformin monotherapy failure. The early recognition of these characteristics can contribute to the establishment of individualized therapeutic strategies and attain better metabolic control during pregnancy.

Open access

Elinor Chelsom Vogt, Francisco Gómez Real, Eystein Sverre Husebye, Sigridur Björnsdottir, Bryndis Benediktsdottir, Randi Jacobsen Bertelsen, Pascal Demoly, Karl Anders Franklin, Leire Sainz de Aja Gallastegui, Francisco Javier Callejas González, Joachim Heinrich, Mathias Holm, Nils Oscar Jogi, Benedicte Leynaert, Eva Lindberg, Andrei Malinovschi, Jesús Martínez-Moratalla, Raúl Godoy Mayoral, Anna Oudin, Antonio Pereira-Vega, Chantal Raherison Semjen, Vivi Schlünssen, Kai Triebner, and Marianne Øksnes

Objective

To investigate markers of premature menopause (<40 years) and specifically the prevalence of autoimmune primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in European women.

Design

Postmenopausal women were categorized according to age at menopause and self-reported reason for menopause in a cross-sectional analysis of 6870 women.

Methods

Variables associated with the timing of menopause and hormone measurements of 17β-estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone were explored using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Specific immunoprecipitating assays of steroidogenic autoantibodies against 21-hydroxylase (21-OH), side-chain cleavage enzyme (anti-SCC) and 17alpha-hydroxylase (17 OH), as well as NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 5 were used to identify women with likely autoimmune POI.

Results

Premature menopause was identified in 2.8% of women, and these women had higher frequencies of nulliparity (37.4% vs 19.7%), obesity (28.7% vs 21.4%), osteoporosis (17.1% vs 11.6%), hormone replacement therapy (59.1% vs 36.9%) and never smokers (60.1% vs 50.9%) (P < 0.05), compared to women with menopause ≥40 years. Iatrogenic causes were found in 91 (47%) and non-ovarian causes in 27 (14%) women, while 77 (39%) women were classified as POI of unknown cause, resulting in a 1.1% prevalence of idiopathic POI. After adjustments nulliparity was the only variable significantly associated with POI (odds ratio 2.46; 95% CI 1.63–3.42). Based on the presence of autoantibodies against 21 OH and SCC, 4.5% of POI cases were of likely autoimmune origin.

Conclusion

Idiopathic POI affects 1.1% of all women and almost half of the women with premature menopause. Autoimmunity explains 4.5% of these cases judged by positive steroidogenic autoantibodies.

Open access

Randi Ugleholdt, Åse Krogh Rasmussen, Pernille A H Haderslev, Bjarne Kromann-Andersen, and Claus Larsen Feltoft

Patients with pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPGL) are treated with α-adrenoceptor antagonists to improve peroperative hemodynamics. However, preoperative blood pressure targets differ between institutions. We retrospectively compared per- and postoperative hemodynamics in 30 patients with PPGL that were pretreated with phenoxybenzamine aiming at different blood pressure targets at two separate endocrine departments. All patients were subsequently undergoing laparoscopic surgery at Department of Urology, Herlev University hospital. Fourteen patients were treated targeting to symptomatic and significant orthostatic hypotension and 16 patients to a seated blood pressure below 130/80 mmHg. As a control group, we included 34 patients undergoing laparoscopic adrenalectomy for other reasons. The group titrated to orthostatic hypotension required a higher dose of phenoxybenzamine to achieve the blood pressure target. This group had less intraoperative systolic and diastolic blood pressure fluctuation (Mann–Whitney U test; P  < 0.05) and less periods with heart rate above 100 b.p.m. (Mann–Whitney U test; P = 0.04) as compared to the group with a preoperative blood pressure target below 130/80 mmHg. Peroperative use of intravenous fluids were similar between the two groups, but postoperatively more intravenous fluids were administered in the group with a target of ortostatism. Overall, the control group was more hemodynamic stable as compared to either group treated for PPGL. We conclude that phenoxybenzamine pretreatment targeting ortostatic hypotension may improve peroperative hemodynamic stability but causes a higher postoperative requirement for intravenous fluids. Overall, PPGL surgery is related to greater hemodynamic instability compared to adrenalectomy for other reasons.

Open access

Alberto Battezzati, Andrea Foppiani, Gianfranco Alicandro, Arianna Bisogno, Arianna Biffi, Giorgio Bedogni, Simona Bertoli, Giulia De Carlo, Erica Nazzari, and Carla Colombo

Objective

Diabetes is a frequent comorbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF), related to multiple unfavorable outcomes. During the progression of β-cell dysfunction to diabetes, insulin deficiency could possibly reduce the anabolic support to grow even in the absence of significant glycemic derangements. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated whether prepuberal insulin secretory indices are independent predictors of adult height.

Design

Observational cohort study.

Research design and methods

A longitudinal analysis of 66 CF patients (33 females) from an ongoing cohort received at prepuberal age (median age of 12 years) modified 3-h oral glucose tolerance tests with 30-min insulin and C-peptide sampling, modeling of insulin secretory and sensitivity parameters, anthropometric evaluation. The latter was repeated when adults after a median follow-up of 9 years.

Results

In alternative models, we found a positive association with either basal insulin secretion (mean 0.22, 95% CI 0.01, 0.44 z-scores) or prepuberal β-cell glucose sensitivity (mean 0.23, 95% CI 0.00, 0.46 z-scores) and adult height, while total insulin secretion was negatively related to adult height (mean −0.36, 95% CI −0.57, −0.15 z-scores or mean −0.42, 95% CI −0.69, −0.16 z-scores, respectively). The high total insulin secretion of low adult height patients was mainly due to late (>60 min) secretion and was associated with a worse glucose response during OGTT.

Conclusions

Abnormal insulin secretion associated with high glucose response during OGTT predicts a decrease in adult height z-score. Our results suggest that insulin secretory defects in CF affect growth prior to the development of fasting hyperglycemia.

Open access

Nidan Qiao, Haixia Cheng, Zhaoyun Zhang, Hongying Ye, Ming Shen, Xuefei Shou, Xiaoyun Cao, Hong Chen, Xiang Zhou, Yongfei Wang, and Yao Zhao

Introduction: Most studies reporting posterior pituitary tumors (PPTs) are small case series or single cases.

Methods: Patients with a histological diagnosis of PPT from January 2010 to December 2021 in a tertiary center were identified. We reported clinical symptoms, endocrine assessments, radiological and pathological features, and surgical outcomes of PPTs.

Results: A total of 51 patients (23 males, 51.3 ± 10.3 years old) with PPT were included in this study. Major symptoms were visual defects, headache, and hypopituitarism, while diabetes insipidus was uncommon (9.8%). The typical radiological feature was homogeneous enhancement (84.3%) of a regular-shaped mass on T1 contrast imaging without cystic change, calcification, or cavernous sinus invasion. We achieved gross total resection in 38/51 patients (74.5%). Pathologically, all tumors showed TTF-1 immunoreactivity. Among 29 patients with suprasellar PPTs, postoperative hemorrhage due to tumor residue was encountered in 2/15 cases in the transcranial group and 0/14 in the endoscopy group. Patients with spindle cell oncocytoma (SCO) were more likely to be surgically treated (25% vs. 0%, P = 0.018), harbor a higher Ki-67 index (16.7% vs. 0% > 5% P = 0.050), and present a lower 2-year recurrence-free survival rate (67.5% vs. 90.9%) compared with patients with pituicytoma or granular cell tumor.

Conclusion: PPTs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with sellar and suprasellar masses with a regular lesion with homogeneous enhancement. SCOs had high proliferation activity and risk of recurrence.

Open access

Simon Chang, Arkadiusz J Goszczak, Anne Skakkebæk, Jens Fedder, Anders Bojesen, M Vakur Bor, Moniek P M de Maat, Claus H Gravholt, and Anna-Marie B Münster

Objective

Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is associated with increased risk of thrombosis. Hypogonadism and accumulating body fat in KS have a potential impact on fibrinolysis. In this study, we assessed the fibrinolytic system and the association with testosterone levels in KS.

Design

This study is a cross-sectional comparison of men with KS and age-matched male controls.

Methods

Fibrin clot lysis was evaluated by turbidity measurements and by measuring levels of individual fibrinolytic proteins in plasma samples. Fibrin clot structure was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Total testosterone was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Body fat was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results

In this study, 45 men with KS and 45 age- and education-matched controls were included. Men with KS had a 24% reduction in fibrin clot lysis compared with controls (46.2 ± 17.1 vs 60.6 ± 18.8 %/h, P  = 0.0003) and higher levels of fibrinogen, factor XIII (P ≤ 0.01), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (P  = 0.04). Men with KS had lower total testosterone (P  = 0.008) and higher body fat (P  = 0.001). In KS, reduced fibrin clot lysability was associated with higher fibrinogen and body fat related to decreasing total testosterone and hypogonadism among men with KS. Fibrin clot structure was not different compared to KS and controls.

Conclusions

Fibrin clot lysis in KS was markedly reduced, potentially contributing to a prothrombotic state and increasing thrombotic risk. Hypogonadism in KS was associated with increased fibrinogen and total body fat, predicting reduced fibrin clot lysis.

Open access

Anna C. van der Burgh, Samer R. Khan, Sebastian J.c.m.m. Neggers, Ewout J Hoorn, and Layal Chaker

Objective/Design: Testosterone might mediate sex differences in kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the few studies analyzing the association between testosterone and kidney function showed conflicting results. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods: Six electronic databases were searched from inception to March 4th, 2020 for studies that investigated the association of 1) testosterone status with kidney function in the general population, or: 2) testosterone status with clinical outcomes (kidney function decline, kidney failure, cardiovascular (CV) events, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality) in CKD patients. We used random and fixed effect models to obtain pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results: No randomized controlled trials that met the inclusion criteria were identified. One study was conducted in the general population and reported an increased risk of incident CKD with low vs. normal testosterone (hazard ratio (HR) 1.38, 95%CI 1.05;1.80). Seven studies were conducted in men with CKD and included testosterone as determinant, of which six could be meta-analyzed. Low testosterone was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality and CV events (pooled HR 1.98, 95%CI 1.36;2.89; pooled HR of 2.40 (95%CI 1.22;4.71), respectively). Two studies showed an increased risk of all-cause mortality with decreased dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) in men with CKD; results regarding CV events were conflicting.

Conclusions: Although literature is scarce, evidence suggests that lower testosterone may increase CKD risk in the general population and risk of all-cause mortality and CV events in men with CKD. Whether testosterone supplementation could prevent these potential detrimental outcomes should be determined in future intervention studies.

Open access

Wenhao Lin, Jun Dai, Jialing Xie, Jiacheng Liu, Fukang Sun, Xin Huang, Wei He, Chen Fang, Juping Zhao, and Danfeng Xu

Purpose: To externally validate the performance of the S-GRAS score and a model from the SEER database in a Chinese cohort of patients with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC).

Methods: We first developed a model using data from the SEER database, after which we retrospectively reviewed 51 ACC patients hospitalized between 2013 and 2018, and we finally validated the model and S-GRAS score in this Chinese cohort.

Results: Patient age at diagnosis, tumor size, TNM stage, and radiotherapy were used to construct the model, and the Harrell’s C-index of the model in the training set was 0.725 (95%CI: 0.682-0.768). However, the 5-year AUC of the model in the validation cohort was 0.598 (95%CI: 0.487-0.708). The 5-year AUC of the ENSAT stage was 0.640 (95%CI: 0.543-0.737), but the Kaplan-Meier curves of stage I and II overlapped in the validation cohort. The resection status (P=0.066), age (P=0.68), Ki67 (P=0.69), and symptoms (P=0.66) did not have a significant impact on cancer-specific survival in the validation cohort. In contrast, the S-GRAS score group showed better discrimination (5-year AUC: 0.683, 95%CI: 0.602-0.764) than the SEER model or the ENSAT stage.

Conclusion: The SEER model showed favorable discrimination and calibration ability in the training set, but it failed to distinguish patients with various prognoses in our institution. In contrast, the S-GRAS score could effectively stratify patients with different outcomes.